Travel Photo of the Day: Soba Noodles in Japan

Staff Writer
Soba noodles are one of Japan’s most common noodle varieties.

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Like the take-out in your fridge, soba noodles in Japan are often eaten cold.

If you’re traveling through Japan, you may notice that not all noodles are created equal. In addition to there being categories of different noodles, there are subcategories, and probably (we assume, at least) even sub-subcategories depending on who you ask.

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One of Japan’s main noodle varieties is soba, which is made from a mix of wheat (or komugi-ko) and buckwheat (or soba-ko) flours. They are generally the same thickness as spaghetti noodles and are served both hot and cold.

When served hot, soba noodles are often used in soups. One of the most basic soba dishes, zaru (pictured above), is actually served cold. The dish features previously-boiled, cold soba noodles with a soy-based dipping sauce. 

As is often the case, versions of soba vary based upon geography and tradition. Depending on your location, the noodles might vary in thickness, as well as ratio of wheat to buckwheat content.

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