The Texican's Famous Chile-con-Queso Recipe

The Texican's Famous Chile-con-Queso Recipe

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Chile-con-Queso has morphed from tradtional Mexican white cheese and rajas (sauteed green chiles and onions) or chorizo to a full blown Tex-Mex version made with trusty Velveeta cheese. In an effort to create a happy medium between tradition and my Tex-Mex upbringing, I've designed a recipe that's truly the best of both worlds.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons corn oil
  • 3/4 cup chopped white onion
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Four 4-ounce cans of chopped green chiles
  • 1/8 cup finely chopped cilantro
  • Pinch of garlic powder
  • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 3/4 cup crushed tomatoes, preferably Rotel
  • 4 ounces medium sharp cheddar cheese, cubed
  • 16 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, cubed
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 2 pounds Velveeta cheese, cubed
  • 1/2 cup canned evaporated milk

Directions

In a large cooking pot, add 2 tablespoons of corn oil and allow to warm for 2 minutes over medium heat. Drop 3/4 cup of chopped white onion into the pot and stir frequently until they become almost translucent. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Next, add the green chiles, cilantro, pinch of garlic powder, chicken or vegetable broth and crushed tomatoes.

Stir ingredients together then place lid 3/4 of the way shut over the pot. Simmer on low heat for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, remove lid and add all cheeses and canned milk. Turn heat back up to medium and stir frequently until all cheese is melted. Season to taste.

Serve with tortilla chips, Fritos, or fresh tortillas and enjoy!

Note: Recipe can be made in advance and actually tastes better if made 24 hours in advance of serving. Prior to refrigerating, let chile-con-queso cool to a luke-warm, which could take approximately one hour.

Chile Shopping Tip

Fresh peppers get hotter as they age; they will achieve a more reddish hue and sometimes develop streaks in the skin.

Chile Cooking Tip

There are 60 varieties of chile peppers, many of which are used in Mexican cooking. Handle them with care. When handling the spicier kinds, gloves are recommended. Always wash your hands with soap and warm water before touching your eyes.

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