White Sumiso Sauce

White Sumiso Sauce
Staff Writer

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

White Sumiso Sauce is a traditional sauce made from young, pale white miso or medium-aged light brown miso, sugar, and vinegar. It has a thick texture and a pleasant soybean flavor with delicious, sweet, sour, and salty characteristics... I use [this sauce] in traditional and modern Japanese preparations and also employ it as a new flavoring element in many popular American recipes, such as salad dressings, marinades, and rubs.

Freezing will not change the texture of the sauce, and prepared sauce can be stored in the freezer for up to three months. When needed, take it out of the freezer, quickly scoop and transfer the necessary portion to a small bowl, and return the container to the freezer to preserve the quality.

Click here to see Cooking with Japanese Flavors Made Easy.

Directions

Place the miso, sake, mirin, and sugar in a medium-sized pot and stir until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium heat for 4-5 minutes, stirring with a whisk. Add the rice vinegar and the juices and cook until the miso sauce is no longer watery, about 8 minutes.

Transfer the sauce to a clean, freezer-proof container. Cover the container with a tight-fitting lid and store it in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Nutrition

Calories per serving:

32 kcal

Daily value:

2%

Servings:

24
  • Carbohydrate, by difference 5 g
  • Protein 1 g
  • Total lipid (fat) 1 g
  • Vitamin A, IU 2 IU
  • Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid 1 mg
  • Vitamin D 106 IU
  • Betaine 1 mg
  • Calcium, Ca 2 mg
  • Carotene, beta 1 µg
  • Choline, total 2 mg
  • Cryptoxanthin, beta 1 µg
  • Fiber, total dietary 1 g
  • Folate, DFE 3 µg
  • Folate, food 5 µg
  • Folate, total 5 µg
  • Lycopene 1 µg
  • Magnesium, Mg 4 mg
  • Niacin 1 mg
  • Phosphorus, P 20 mg
  • Potassium, K 49 mg
  • Selenium, Se 3 µg
  • Sodium, Na 7 mg
  • Vitamin D (D2 + D3) 3 µg
  • Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) 3 µg
  • Water 12 g
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