A very fig tart

A very fig tart

This morning I woke up dreaming of jammy, baked figs.

When they are ripe and in season, I would happily eat them just as they are (maybe with some cheese and honey). Still, this tart is so autumnal yet bright with summer flavors that I had to give it a try.

Ingredients

  • pâté brisee
  • 1/2  Cup  creme de marron
  • 3  Tablespoons  fig jam
  • 8-10  plump, ripe figs
  • 1/2  Teaspoon  lemon juice
  • 1/2  Teaspoon  cinnamon
  • 1  Tablespoon  balsamic glaze (for drizzling on top)

Directions

Fig tart with chestnut cream

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Wash and trim the figs and slice them into fairly thin rounds – you should get about 4 pieces out of each fig.

2. Roll out pastry and drape it over your cake pan – I suggest using a deeper springform pan here. Crimp the edges, leaving a pretty high ‘border’ for the filling to expand and bubble away.

3. Swirl together the fig jam and chestnut cream and spread evenly on the bottom of the tart. Layer the fig slices on top the the filling, making one layer, then going over a second time to fill in any ‘gaps.’ You want this to be a very fig tart, remember!

4. Sprinkle figs with lemon juice and a little bit of cinnamon. Drizzle balsamic glaze on top in a crisscross pattern.

5. Bake for about 40-45 minutes until the pastry is golden and the filling is jammy. Let set and cool completely before cutting.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
1g
1%
Sugar
11g
12%
Cholesterol
2mg
1%
Carbohydrate, by difference
12g
9%
Protein
1g
2%
Vitamin A, RAE
1µg
0%
Calcium, Ca
6mg
1%
Choline, total
4mg
1%
Folate, total
3µg
1%
Magnesium, Mg
3mg
1%
Phosphorus, P
11mg
2%
Selenium, Se
1µg
2%
Sodium, Na
30mg
2%
Water
8g
0%

Fig Shopping Tip

Buying fruits in season when they are at the peak of their freshness make for great tasting food and can save you money.

Fig Cooking Tip

Don’t throw out your overripe fruit – instead blend into a smoothie or salad dressing, add to muffin batter, bake into a cobbler, or boil down with sugar and a little lemon juice to make jam.