Pork and Ginger Pot Stickers

This special-occasion dish might be a little labor-intensive, but it’s well worth the effort.
potstickers

The Center of Discovery

This special-occasion dish might be a little labor-intensive, but it’s well worth the effort. “They will be gone in minutes,” predicts Chef Parten.

Recipe excerpted from The Center for Discovery cookbook Feeding the Heart: Recipes, Flavors and the Seed to Belly Philosophy of the Department of Nourishment Arts.

10
Servings
127
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 4 cups finely chopped green cabbage
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 1/2 pound ground pork
  • 2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh gingerroot
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 4 tablespoons tamari
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 60 wonton wrappers
  • 2 tablespoons oil or pork fat
  • Water

Directions

Combine the cabbage and half the salt in a large bowl. Toss, then set aside for 30 minutes.

Transfer cabbage to a clean dish towel or doubled piece of cheesecloth. Gather the ends together and twist to squeeze out as much moisture as possible from the cabbage.

In a separate bowl, combine the wrung-dry cabbage with the pork, ginger, garlic, tamari, sesame oil, egg, and the remaining ½ tablespoon salt. Mix thoroughly.

Assembling the pot stickers:

Lay a few wrappers on your cutting board, covering the remainder with a damp dish towel so they do not dry out. Brush half the perimeter of each square with water, then place about ½ tablespoon of the filling in the center. Avoid getting filling on the edges of the wrappers—it will prevent them from sealing properly.

Fold each wrapper in half so the edges meet. Seal each dumpling by pressing the wrapper edges between your fingers. Position the dumpling with the seal pointing up (not lying on its side). Starting at the center, fold a small piece of the edge to form a pleat. Repeat, working toward the bottom right corner, so that each dumpling has two or three pleats. Then duplicate these steps, starting at the center and working toward the bottom left corner. Gently press the dumplings onto the work surface to flatten the bottoms. Continue filling and folding wrappers in this way until all the filling has been used.

Heat the oil or pork fat in a nonstick skillet over high heat. Swirl to coat the pan.

When the oil or fat begins to shimmer, add the pot stickers, flattened bottoms down. Turn the flame down to medium.

Cook, undisturbed, until lightly browned on the bottom, about 4 minutes. Watch carefully, as they can brown quickly.

Add about ½ cup of water and immediately cover to prevent the pot stickers from splitting. Steam until the dumplings are puffy yet firm and water has evaporated, 5 to 6 minutes. Check from time to time to make sure skillet has not boiled dry before pot stickers are done.

After water has evaporated, remove the lid and continue to cook over medium-high heat to recrisp the pot stickers on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a platter and serve with an Asian-style dipping sauce. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
7g
10%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Cholesterol
26mg
9%
Carbohydrate, by difference
7g
5%
Protein
11g
24%
Vitamin A, RAE
253µg
36%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
44mg
59%
Calcium, Ca
74mg
7%
Choline, total
29mg
7%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
55µg
14%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
68mg
21%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Phosphorus, P
112mg
16%
Selenium, Se
12µg
22%
Sodium, Na
554mg
37%
Water
96g
4%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Pork Shopping Tip

Bone-in cuts tend to be slightly less expensive than their boneless counterparts, and have more flavor.

Pork Cooking Tip

According to the USDA, the recommended internal temperature for cooked pork should be 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pork Wine Pairing

Tempranillo, dolcetto, gewürztraminer, or muscat with roast pork; carmènere with  pork sausage; sangiovese, pinotage, or richer sauvignon blancs for stir-fried or braised pork dishes or pork in various sauces; syrah/shiraz, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nero d'avola, or primitivo with barbecued spareribs or pulled pork, or with cochinito en pibil and other Mexican-spiced pork dishes.