Pressure Cooker Mashed Turnips

Don't be afraid of unfamiliar vegetables. Mashed turnips make a great side dish and will have you eating turnips all the time
Mashed Turnips in Slow Cooker

Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com

This recipe will have you eating turnips all the time. Cook these white root vegetables in your pressure cooker to achevie crazy flavor with the help of stock and sour cream. 

Excerpted from The New Pressure Cooker Cookbook by Adams Media. Copyright © 2016 F+W Media, Inc. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. 

4
Servings
25
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • medium turnips, peeled and diced
  • small onion, peeled and diced
  • 1/2  Cup  beef or chicken broth
  • 1/4  Cup  sour cream
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

Add the turnips, onion, and broth to the pressure cooker. Lock the lid into place and bring to high pressure; maintain pressure for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes.

Drain the turnips or use a slotted spoon to transfer them to a serving bowl. Use a handheld mixer or immersion blender to purée the turnips, adding some of the broth from the pressure cooker if necessary.

Stir in the sour cream. Taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper, to taste.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
2g
3%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
7mg
2%
Vitamin A, RAE
23µg
3%
Calcium, Ca
13mg
1%
Choline, total
3mg
1%
Fluoride, F
18µg
1%
Folate, total
1µg
0%
Magnesium, Mg
2mg
1%
Phosphorus, P
12mg
2%
Selenium, Se
1µg
2%
Sodium, Na
109mg
7%
Water
34g
1%

Pressure Cooker Shopping Tip

A pressure cooker is a useful tool in the kitchen when you don't have much time to cook something down.

Pressure Cooker Cooking Tip

A common use for a pressure cooker is making stock or cooking down meats that normally time hours to break down in a fraction of the time.

Pressure Cooker Wine Pairing

Most red wines, including cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, mourvedre, Rhone blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nebbiolo, nero d'avola, primitivo, barbera, and sangiovese with beef or lamb (cabernet sauvignon is particularly appropriate for lamb). Tempranillo, dolcetto, gewürztraminer, or muscat for roast pork; carménère with pork sausage; sangiovese, pinotage, or richer sauvignon blancs with stir-fried or braised pork dishes or pork in various sauces; syrah/shiraz,   mourvedreRhone blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nero d'avola, or primitivo with barbecued spareribs or pulled pork, or with cochinito en pibil and other Mexican-spiced pork dishes. Pinot gris/grigio, riesling, richer sauvignon blanc, or torrontes with veal dishes.