Lobster Linguine with White Wine Sauce

Lobster Linguine with White Wine Sauce
Contributor
Lobster Linguine with White Wine Sauce

Nicole Campoy-Leffler

Lobster Linguine with White Wine Sauce

Cooking with lobster garners tons of bragging rights and maybe even a few Facebook status updates. It’s not just that they are a hot commodity or that any dish is made better by them, it’s that you so rarely hear of home cooks getting to play around with those delicious-when-dunked-in-butter creatures.

So when it came time to drum up a lobster recipe, I didn’t waver at all. Fresh lobster goes perfectly with a steaming plate of buttery, white wine-y, herby linguine. I was pretty excited to make this at home as it’s something I’d savor in a restaurant. It’s not a particularly difficult recipe, you just have to pay close attention to the timing of everything. 

Click here for more lobster recipes. 

Notes

Be sure to taste the sauce before taking it off the heat, so that it's reduced enough to your taste.

My favorite lobster linguine came from an Italian restaurant in Santa Barbara. When I asked the chef what his secret ingredient was, he said a touch of cognac and some heavy cream in his white wine sauce. Oh, and extra butter. I don’t have his amounts, though, so experiment at your own risk. (I also didn’t have any extra cognac laying around...) 

Ingredients

  • 6  Tablespoons  butter, room temperature and cut into small pads
  • Olive oil
  • shallots, chopped
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2  dry white wine
  • thyme
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 1  Cup  dry linguine
  • 1 1/4  Pound  cooked lobster, meat removed from the shell
  • Parmesan cheese for garnish

Directions

Put an ounce of butter into a medium-sized sauté pan with a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook until translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Then, add the lemon juice and white wine, stirring everything together. Add the thyme, salt, and pepper and stir slowly again. Then, add the rest of the butter slowly, letting each piece melt into the sauce completely. Turn the heat down slightly and let the sauce reduce.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the linguine for 7–11 minutes, until al dente. Strain the linguine and add immediately to the white wine sauce, followed quickly by the cooked lobster meat. Stir everything together, making sure it’s all coated and incorporated. Plate immediately and garnish with Parmesan cheese.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
14g
20%
Sugar
11g
12%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Cholesterol
394mg
100%
Carbohydrate, by difference
31g
24%
Protein
81g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
13µg
2%
Vitamin B-12
5µg
100%
Vitamin B-6
2mg
100%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
1mg
1%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
8µg
9%
Calcium, Ca
103mg
10%
Choline, total
226mg
53%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
97µg
24%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
104mg
33%
Niacin
35mg
100%
Pantothenic acid
3mg
60%
Phosphorus, P
839mg
100%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
98µg
100%
Sodium, Na
1015mg
68%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
1µg
7%
Water
298g
11%
Zinc, Zn
5mg
63%

Lobster Linguine Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Lobster Linguine Cooking Tip

Looking for a quick mid-week dinner? Seafood is a safe bet. It's quick to cook and simple recipes can get dinner on the table in 20 minutes.

Lobster Linguine Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish