Kohlrabi, Fennel, and Bing Cherry Salad

Kohlrabi, Fennel, and Bing Cherry Salad
Staff Writer
Kohlrabi, Fennel, and Bing Cherry Salad

Dan Goldberg

Kohlrabi, Fennel, and Bing Cherry Salad

This salad is beyond simple, but that’s what makes it so great. I love kohlrabi but feel like it often gets left behind because not many people recognize it.

To me, kohlrabi tastes sort of like a cross between a broccoli stem and a turnip, with nice refreshing notes and just a bit of bite. Most people think you have to cook kohlrabi, but just like Brussels sprouts, it's great simply raw in a salad, so long as it’s shaved thin and allowed to sit in the olive oil for just a minute to soften.


  • 2 bulbs kohlrabi, stalks and hard stems removed, halved lengthwise
  • 1 bulb fennel, stalks removed, and halved
  • 16 Bing cherries, pitted and halved
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon preserved lemon, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon fresh mint, torn, for garnish


Shave the kohlrabi very thinly on a mandolin, leaf-side down since the root side tends to be a bit woody. Next, shave the fennel very thinly on the mandolin, turning it to shave around the inner core.

Combine the kohlrabi and fennel in a large salad bowl. Add the cherries, oil, and preserved lemon, and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Toss to combine and let the salad sit for about 5 minutes to soften the kohlrabi. Garnish with the mint, and serve.

Kohlrabi Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Kohlrabi Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.