Japchae (Korean Stir-Fried Starch Noodles with Vegetables)

Japchae (Korean Stir-Fried Starch Noodles with Vegetables)
Staff Writer
Japchae
Hyosun Ro
Japchae

Japchae literally translated means "mixed vegetables." But the main ingredient of this classic dish is Korean sweet potato starch noodles (dangmyeon), also known as glass noodles. The chewy and springy noodles are well balanced with thin strips of cooked vegetables (typically carrots, spinach, onions, shiitake mushrooms, cucumbers, and bell peppers) and beef.

All of the ingredients, separately cooked to develop the layers of flavor, are combined at the end into a delicious and colorful dish. This classic method is what makes this dish special and a Korean favorite for special occasions and traditional holidays. Serve it as a first course or side dish or over a bed of rice to make it a main dish.

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4
Servings
352
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

Note: Leftover japchae should be kept refrigerated. Japchae reheats well in the microwave. The noodles will get soft and chewy again.

*Note: Dried shiitake is ideal for its concentrated flavor and meatier texture, but you can use any kind of fresh or dried mushrooms such as oyster or button mushrooms.

Ingredients

For the sauce

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

For the noodles

  • 6 ounces Korean potato starch noodles (dangmyeon)
  • 4 ounces lean beef, such as sirloin or rib-eye, cut into 2-inch-long strips
  • 4-5 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked until plump, stemmed, and sliced into ¼-inch-thick strips*
  • 6 ounces fresh spinach
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 small carrot, cut into sticks
  • 1 small sweet onion, sliced thinly
  • 2 scallions, sliced thinly
  • 4 teaspoons oil, for stir-frying

Directions

For the sauce

Combine all of the ingredients and mix well until the sugar is dissolved. Set aside.

For the noodles

Cook the starch noodles according to the package directions. Rinse in cold water and drain. Cut the noodles with kitchen shears or a knife into 6- to 7-inch lengths. Place in a bowl, mix in 2 tablespoons of the prepared sauce, and set aside.

In a bowl, mix the beef with 1 tablespoon of the sauce. In another bowl, do the same with the mushrooms. Bring a small pot of water to boil over high heat, and blanch the spinach in boiling water only until wilted. Drain quickly and shock in cold water. Squeeze out excess water, cut into about 2-inch lengths, and lightly season with salt and pepper.

In a lightly oiled nonstick skillet, sauté each remaining vegetable separately with 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat for about 1-2 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. (Do not overcook. The vegetables should be crisp.) With the remaining oil, sauté the beef for about 1-2 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Reduce heat to medium and sauté the noodles, stirring frequently, until translucent and sticky, about 3-4 minutes.

Combine all of the ingredients and the remaining sauce. Toss well, preferably by hand. Add more soy sauce and/or sugar, to taste.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
20g
29%
Sugar
4g
4%
Saturated Fat
2g
8%
Cholesterol
19mg
6%
Carbohydrate, by difference
32g
25%
Protein
13g
28%
Vitamin A, RAE
111µg
16%
Vitamin B-12
1µg
42%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
8mg
11%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
179µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
127mg
13%
Choline, total
7mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
4g
16%
Folate, total
36µg
9%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
66mg
21%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
2mg
14%
Phosphorus, P
169mg
24%
Selenium, Se
9µg
16%
Sodium, Na
951mg
63%
Water
81g
3%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Noodle Shopping Tip

Staples of Asian cuisine such as ginger, daikon, rice vinegar, and spicy chile sauces like Sriracha add bright, fresh flavors without lots of fuss.

Noodle Cooking Tip

Sriracha has good heat but also has flavor - its mild sweetness comes from sun-ripened chile peppers as well as sugar and garlic.