Garlicky Chicken Pressure Cooker Stew

Garlicky Chicken Pressure Cooker Stew
Staff Writer
Garlicky Chicken Pressure Cooker Stew

Ah, the wonders of pressure cooking — in a mere 20 minutes from start to finish (including cooking time) you can make a big batch of homemade chicken stew that's piping hot and ready to eat. What's more, the stew also includes items like lentils, brown rice, and potatoes, which normally take about an hour to break down. Plus, with minimal prep work involved, this recipe will make you seem like a superhuman who can get it all done with time to spare. 

Ingredients

  • bone-in skinless chicken breasts, rinsed and patted dry
  • garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • russet potato, peeled, halved, and thinly sliced
  • sweet potato, peeled, halved, and thinly sliced
  • 1/2  dried lentils
  • 1/2  long-grain brown rice
  • kosher salt
  • ground cayenne
  • 1/2  ground ginger
  • 1/2  ground coriander
  • chicken broth, preferably homemade
  • water

Directions

Brown the chicken breasts on all sides using either the browning function of the pressure cooker or a heavy pan set over medium-high heat, then set the chicken aside. 

Add the garlic, potatoes, lentils, rice, spices, and chicken to the pressure cooker pot — stir everything gently to coat. Add the broth and water to the pot, making sure the chicken is completely covered. The liquid should not fill the pot more than 60 percent of the way. Secure the pressure cooker according to your model's instructions and adjust the settings to cook at high pressure for 10 minutes. 

When the stew is done cooking, carefully alleviate the cooking pressure using the quick release function, and serve immediately, or store in the fridge until ready to use. 

Garlic Shopping Tip

Italian food is about simplicity and letting the ingredients shine. So make sure you get ingredients that are great quality and flavor. Farmers markets and specialty stores will have great produce and products. Just be sure to have some great olive oil.

Garlic Cooking Tip

Unlike other highly regarded cuisines, Italian cooking is usually simple to make with many dishes having only 4 to 8 ingredients. Italian cooks rely chiefly on the quality of the ingredients rather than on elaborate preparation.