Eggplant alla Parmigiana Recipe

Eggplant alla Parmigiana Recipe
Editor

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

The name of this familiar Italian specialty is misleading. The term alla parmigiana means “in the style of Parma” (or “of a woman of Parma”), but the dish has nothing to do with the cooking of that famous city in Emilia-Romagna. It is a southern Italian dish, claimed by both Sicily and Naples — probably the two parts of Italy where eggplant is eaten most.

The familiar explanation for the name is that the dish usually includes, in addition to the mozzarella that is its second most-important ingredient, a sprinkling of Parmigiano-Reggiano. If that were the case, though, it would be “al [or col] parmigiano.” A more likely explanation seems to be that “parmigiana” is a corruption of a Sicilian dialect word for the pattern of wooden slats that overlap in window shutters (like the slices of eggplant in this dish) — palmigiana (according to Mary Taylor Simeti) or parmiciana (according to Anna Pomar).

Italian American versions of this dish often fry the eggplant slices first in an egg batter or breadcrumbs, but that is rare in Italy.

6
Servings
1488
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

*Note: You can also substitute one 28-ounce can whole San Marzano tomatoes, drained and finely chopped, for every 2 cups of tomato sauce.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups tomato sauce*
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 15-20 basil leaves
  • 3 pounds large eggplants, cut crosswise into slices ½-inch thick
  • 1/2 pound fresh mozzarella, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated

Directions

Heat 3 tablespoons of the oil in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until it begins to color, 1-2 minutes. If using the tomato sauce, stir it into the garlic and oil and cook for 2-3 minutes. Julienne 6 of the basil leaves and add them to the pan. Cook for 5 more minutes, then set aside. (If using the canned tomatoes, add them to the garlic and oil, season with salt and pepper, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer, stirring frequently, until thickened to a sauce, about 30 minutes. Stir in the julienned basil during the last 5 minutes of cooking.) Set the sauce aside.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Heat the remaining oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add the eggplant slices and fry, turning them once, until soft and golden brown, 2-3 minutes per side. As the eggplant is finishes cooking, drain it on paper towels.

Spread a layer of the tomato sauce over the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Cover the sauce with a layer of eggplant slices, overlapping them slightly. Arrange slices of the mozzarella over the eggplant, then spread another layer of tomato sauce on top of the cheese. Repeat the process to use all the tomato sauce, eggplant, and mozzarella, ending with a layer of sauce. Scatter the whole basil leaves over the sauce, then sprinkle the Parmigiano over the top.

Bake until the sauce is bubbling and the cheese is golden brown, 25-30 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
130g
100%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
75g
100%
Cholesterol
219mg
73%
Carbohydrate, by difference
17g
13%
Protein
61g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
27µg
4%
Vitamin B-12
6µg
100%
Vitamin B-6
1mg
77%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
14mg
19%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
2µg
2%
Calcium, Ca
64mg
6%
Choline, total
29mg
7%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
42µg
11%
Iron, Fe
7mg
39%
Magnesium, Mg
72mg
23%
Niacin
12mg
86%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
495mg
71%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
58µg
100%
Sodium, Na
303mg
20%
Water
186g
7%
Zinc, Zn
15mg
100%

Eggplant Shopping Tip

Look for vegetables that are firm and bright in color – avoid those that are wilted or have wrinkled skins, which are signs of age.

Eggplant Cooking Tip

Vegetables should typically be cooked as quickly as possible, as they can become bland and mushy, and lose vitamins and minerals.