Cumin and Cinnamon Spiced Couscous with Chicken

Thick and creamy couscous stew studded with chicken, raisins, and carrots
Israeli Couscous

Shutterstock

The starch in the couscous thickens the stew as it cooks creating a creamy and comforting main dish. You won’t believe how easy and tantalizingly delcious this one pot meal is. The cumin and cinnamon provide a wealth of flavor, and for the best results use high quality chicken and chicken stock. This recipe can also be adapted to be made in a rice cooker. 

2
Servings
1205
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • Olive oil, for sauteing
  • 1 Medium-size Yellow Onion, diced small
  • 2 Carrots, Diced
  • 2 Chicken Breasts, cut into cubes
  • 32 Ounces (1 pkg) Chicken Stock
  • 1 Tablespoon Cumin
  • 1 Tablespoon Cinnamon
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1 Cup Israeli Couscous
  • 1/4 Cup Golden Raisins
  • 1/4 Cup Parsley, finely chopped

Directions

In a medium pot, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Sautee onion until it becomes translucent, about 5-8 minutes. Next, add the chicken stock and bring to a simmer.

Add carrots, chicken, couscous, salt, spices and raisins and cook over low to medium heat until chicken is cooked through and the couscous is tender.  Adjust seasoning as necessary.

Serve hot with a sprinkle of chopped parsley on top. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
25g
36%
Sugar
38g
42%
Saturated Fat
6g
25%
Cholesterol
27mg
9%
Carbohydrate, by difference
207g
100%
Protein
46g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
5µg
1%
Vitamin B-6
1mg
77%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
39mg
52%
Vitamin E, added
1mg
7%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
175mg
18%
Choline, total
9mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
17g
68%
Folate, total
67µg
17%
Iron, Fe
21mg
100%
Magnesium, Mg
142mg
44%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
6mg
43%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
261mg
37%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
37µg
67%
Sodium, Na
4547mg
100%
Water
310g
11%
Zinc, Zn
4mg
50%

Cumin Shopping Tip

Spices and dried herbs have a shelf life too, and lose potency over time. The rule of thumb is, if your spices are over two years old, it's time to buy some new ones.

Cumin Cooking Tip

Toasting whole spices before using them intensifies their aroma and flavor.