Chocolate Rum Crinkle Cookies

Chocolate Rum Crinkle Cookies
Staff Writer

Allan Penn

Today we celebrate cocoa powder of all varieties. Cocoa comes from the bean of the cacao tree. The trees grow in many parts of the world, but the earliest known cultivation of cocoa was in the Amazon, where archaeologists have found evidence of its use dating back to 1900 BC. More famously, the Mayans were known to have used the cocoa bean as food, and currency in fertility rites, while the Aztecs ground it into a bitter drink. Both cultures believed cocoa to be linked to the gods, but it wasn’t until the 1700s that the taxonomer Linnaeus aptly named the source of cocoa beans Theabroma Cacao, meaning "gift of the gods." Less sweet than some, these crinkle cookies are absolutely loaded with cocoa and just a hint of rum flavor. Because the cookies are made with baking powder, I make these with Dutch-processed cocoa and get fat, fudgy cookies every time.

Ingredients

  • 2  Cups  all-purpose flour
  • 2  Teaspoons  baking powder
  • 1/2  Teaspoon  salt
  • 1  Cup  Dutch-processed cocoa powder
  • large eggs
  • 1  Cup  granulated sugar
  • 1/2  Cup  vegetable oil
  • 1  Teaspoon  rum extract
  • 3/4  Teaspoons  vanilla extract
  • 3 1/2  Ounces  dark chocolate, finely chopped
  • 1  Cup  confectioners' sugar

Directions

Mix the flour, baking powder, salt, and cocoa together in a small bowl; set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, or in a large mixing bowl using a handheld electric mixer, beat the eggs on medium-high speed for about 2 minutes or until light. Reduce the speed to medium and gradually add the granulated sugar. Using the lowest speed of a stand mixer, or with a mixing spoon, stir in the oil and extracts. Add the flour mixture and stir until incorporated, then remove from the mixer stand (if using) and stir in the chocolate. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place in the freezer for 40 minutes, or until firm enough to handle.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place a rack in the upper third of the oven. Line 2 baking sheets with nonstick foil or parchment paper.

Pour or sift the confectioners’ sugar onto a plate. Scoop up heaping tablespoons of cold dough and shape into 1½-inch balls. Roll the balls in the sugar to coat generously. Arrange the balls 2 ½ inches apart on the prepared baking sheets. Bake 1 sheet at a time for 10 minutes or just until they appear puffy and set. Immediately transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Baker’s Notes: For the prettiest cookies, be very generous with the confectioners’ sugar and bake the cookies in the upper third of the oven until they are just cooked through.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
21g
30%
Sugar
6g
7%
Saturated Fat
4g
17%
Carbohydrate, by difference
52g
40%
Protein
7g
15%
Vitamin A, RAE
68µg
10%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
9µg
10%
Calcium, Ca
67mg
7%
Choline, total
1mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
10g
40%
Folate, total
25µg
6%
Iron, Fe
7mg
39%
Magnesium, Mg
17mg
5%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
76mg
11%
Selenium, Se
4µg
7%
Sodium, Na
354mg
24%
Water
20g
1%

Chocolate Shopping Tip

There are so many varieties of chocolate on the shelves today it can be overwhelming to pick one – as a general rule of thumb, the fewer the ingredients, the better the chocolate.

Chocolate Cooking Tip

When melting chocolate, use a double boiler and stir occasionally to avoid scorching chocolate at the bottom of the bowl.

Chocolate Wine Pairing

Sweet chenin blanc, muscat, or amontillado sherry with nut-based desserts; sauternes or sweet German wines with pound cake, cheesecake, and other mildly sweet desserts; sweet chenin blanc or muscat or Alsatian vendange tardive (late harvest) wines with sweeter desserts; sweet chenin blanc or muscat or Alsatian vendange tardive (late harvest) wines, port, madeira, late-harvest zinfandel, or cabernet sauvignon or cabernet franc with chocolate desserts.