Pumpkin Pie Recipe


Nutrition

Cal/Serving: 265
Daily Value: 13%
Servings: 8

Vegetarian, Peanut-Free, Tree-Nut-Free, Soy-Free, Fish-Free, Shellfish-Free
Fat12g19%
Saturated5g27%
Trans0g0%
Carbs37g12%
Fiber2g7%
Sugars19g0%
Protein4g8%
Cholesterol58mg19%
Sodium152mg6%
Calcium60mg6%
Magnesium17mg4%
Potassium169mg5%
Iron1mg6%
Zinc0mg3%
Vitamin A6132IU123%
Vitamin C2mg3%
Thiamin (B1)0mg3%
Riboflavin (B2)0mg8%
Niacin (B3)1mg3%
Vitamin B60mg3%
Folic Acid (B9)19µg5%
Vitamin B120µg4%
Vitamin D0µg0%
Vitamin E1mg3%
Vitamin K7µg8%
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated4g0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated1g0%
Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

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More Recipes By Jennifer Reese


Pumpkin
Stock.XCHNG/shuttermon

I had always used canned pumpkin for pie, because it was what my mother and grandmother used. But I liked the idea of starting with a whole food rather than a can, and what if canned pumpkin turned out to be just as inferior as canned sweet potatoes and I just didn’t know better?

I baked two pies, identical except for the source of the pumpkin. Pie number one contained the flesh of a sugar pie pumpkin that I roasted for an hour, peeled, seeded, de-stringed, and forced through the food mill. Pie number two contained the flesh of a pumpkin that Libby’s had processed in a plant and I scooped out of the can.

The results: The canned pumpkin was (obviously) more convenient, and I did not have to wait for it to roast. It was also slightly more expensive — about $0.50 more than the whole pumpkin. But those were 50 cents well spent, because it made a superior pumpkin pie — the flavor was bigger, rounder, more pumpkin-y.

My advice: When you’re standing at the supermarket the day before Thanksgiving pondering your pumpkin options, grab the can and get in the checkout line before it grows any longer. You’re not being squeamish, you’re being sensible.

Make it or buy it? Make it. (But buy the can.)

Click here to see the homemade pie crust recipe. 

5
Ratings2

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/4 cups canned pumpkin purée
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • One 9-inch pie crust, partially baked*

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine the pumpkin, eggs, sugars, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and half-and-half and beat until smooth. Pour into the crust. Bake for 35 minutes, and remove from the oven. This is incredible served warm out of the oven, and almost as good cold.

Recipe Details

Hassle: Once you have the crust, it’s just stir, pour, and bake.

Cost comparison:

Homemade: $3.68. Sara Lee frozen: $5.99. Safeway in-house bakery: $8.79.

 

Adapted from Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldn’t Cook From Scratchby Jennifer Reese (Free Press, 2011)

Servings: 8
Cuisine: Dessert

Notes and Substitutions:

*Note: Click here to see the pie crust recipe.



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