New Study Claims Junk Food Unrelated to Obesity; Other New Study Says It Leads to Diabetes

Staff Writer
Two studies on junk food have been released: One claims it does not lead to weight gain, the other says it leads to diabetes and
Confused about the severity of junk food’s consequences? We are too.

Shutterstock

Confused about the severity of junk food’s consequences? We are too.

Two junk food studies, both alike in subject, in fair academia where we lay our scene.  Two groups of researchers recently released diverse studies on the consequences (or lack thereof) of junk food. According to scientists from TNO, Microbiology and Systems Biology Group in Zeist, The Netherlands, even indulging in just one high-caloric treat daily could raise your risk of suffering heart attack, stroke and type 2 diabetes. In another study published by Cornell University researchers, they found that consuming fast food or junk food was not tied to increased risk for obesity.

Gerald Weissmann, editor-in-chief of The FASEB Journal, which published the former study, told The Daily Mail, “Eating junk food is one of those situations where our brains say ’yes’ and our bodies say ’no.’ Even one unhealthy snack has negative consequences that extend far beyond any pleasure it brings.”

However, according to the second study, researchers found very little correlation between eating strictly junk food and gaining weight. Instead, they said, weight gain was tied to overall high-caloric consumption.

“For 95% of this study’s sample, the association between fast food, soft drinks, and candy and BMI was negative,” researchers wrote in the study. “This result suggests that a strategy that focuses solely on these problem foods may be ineffective in reducing weight. Reducing the total calories of food eaten at home and the frequency of snacking may be more successful dieting advice for the majority of individuals.”

Related Links
8 D.I.Y. Junk Food Guilty PleasuresTell the Editors: Your Junk Food VicesHealthy Food Is as Cheap as Junk FoodChildhood Obesity Blamed on Genes, Junk FoodJunk Food Cravings Attack at Night