Oxford Dictionaries Approved Lots of Food and Drink Words in Their Latest Update

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The new dictionary update defines words like hangry, wine o’clock, and cat café
Oxford Dictionaries’ Food & Drink

Photo Oxford English Dictionary Modified: Flickr/mrpolyonymous/CC 4.0

These are the new food and drink words that were added to Oxford Dictionaries.

Oxford Dictionaries added new words to the dictionary, including a few food- and drink-related words.

Most of the new words are pop culture references and Internet slang. Take a look at some of their definitions.

  • Barbacoa (noun): beef, lamb, or other meat that has been slowly cooked with seasonings, typically shredded as a filling in tacos, burritos, etc.
  • Beer o’clock (noun): an appropriate time of day to start drinking beer.
  • Cakeage (noun): a charge made by a restaurant for serving a cake that they have not supplied themselves.
  • Cat café (noun): a café or similar establishment where people pay to interact with cats housed on the premises.
  • Cheffy (adjective): relating to or characteristic of a chef, especially one with elaborate recipes or complicated techniques.
  • Cidery (adjective): a place where cider is made.
  • Cupcakery (noun): a bakery that specializes in cupcakes.
  • Fast-casual (adjective): denoting or relating to a type of high-quality self-service restaurant offering dishes that are prepared to order and more expensive than those available in a typical fast-food restaurant.
  • Hangry (adjective): bad-tempered or irritable as a result of hunger.
  • Snackable (adjective): suitable to be eaten as a snack.
  • Wine o’clock (noun): an appropriate time of day to start drinking wine.
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