New York’s Famous Carnegie Deli Is Finally Open Again After a 10-Month Hiatus

Carnegie Deli is finally open again after being shut down in April 2015 for allegedly illegally siphoning gas
Staff Writer
Pastrami, piled high, is on the menu once again.

Carnegie Deli

Pastrami, piled high, is on the menu once again.

The borscht is back in town.

Carnegie Deli, the New York City institution known for its mile-high pastrami sandwiches and house-made kosher dill pickles served with every order, is finally back after a 10-month hiatus.

Designated by many as “the most famous delicatessen in the world,” Carnegie Deli was forced to close in April 2015 after Con Edison discovered a diverted gas line allegedly used for illegal gas siphoning. The deli was soon slapped with a stop work order and shut down almost immediately. This week, Carnegie Deli reopened, much to the delight of its many fans who have been missing their brisket.

After a thorough investigation following the shutdown, Con Edison discovered that the illegal gas siphoning had been going on for nearly six years, and charged the deli’s owner, Marian Harper,$40,000 for the utilities money owed over that timeframe. In addition, the city’s Department of Buildings fined Carnegie $2,600, according to The New York Times.

Gas siphoning is not just illegal; it’s also highly dangerous. Con Edison discovered the gas hook-up after responding to a gas leakage in the area. Last year around the same time, a major explosion that rocked the East Village was determined to have been caused by a similar siphoning hookup.

Carnegie Deli was closed until proper repairs could be made, all of which took longer than expected, Harper told The New York Times.

“This is beyond my wildest nightmare,” she said. But, she added, “As long as I’m breathing, this place was going to reopen.” 

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