Nasturtium Salad with Omelette Ribbons Recipe

Nasturtium Salad with Omelette Ribbons Recipe
Staff Writer
Nasturtium Salad with Omelette Ribbons

Thomas J. Story

Nasturtium Salad with Omelette Ribbons

A colorful and tasty spring salad topped with strips of omelette makes for a meal on its own. 


  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 ½ teaspoons honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon plus ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3 cups loosely packed nasturtium leaves, stems removed
  • 3 cups loosely packed mesclun (baby lettuces)
  • 1-2 cups nasturtium blossoms, stems removed


In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, honey, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of the oil.

In a 10-inch nonstick frying pan, heat the remaining 1 teaspoon oil over medium heat. Meanwhile, in another small bowl, whisk together the eggs and the remaining ¼ teaspoon salt until well blended.

When the oil is hot, pour the eggs into the pan. As the eggs begin to set, lift the edge with a spatula and tilt the pan to let the uncooked mixture on top flow underneath. Work your way around the omelette, lifting one section of the edge at a time and tilting the pan, until the omelette is set underneath. Continue to cook until the top is only slightly moist, 1- 2 minutes.

Slide the omelette onto a heatproof plate. Invert the pan over the plate and, holding the pan and plate together with pot holders, flip them over together so the omelette falls back into the pan. Return the omelette to the heat until the underneath is just set, 1-2 minutes more. Slide the omelette onto a cutting board and cut into ribbons ¼-inch wide.

In a serving bowl, combine the nasturtium leaves, mesclun, and omelette ribbons and toss gently to mix. Drizzle on the dressing and toss again. Sprinkle with the nasturtium blossoms and serve. 

Salad Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Salad Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.

Salad Wine Pairing

Salads with vinegar-based dressings don't go well with wine. Albariño, torrontés, or riesling with seafood or poultry salads in mayonnaise- or cream-based dressings; pinot gris/grigio, sauvignon blanc, sémillion, or grüner veltliner with salads with lemon juice-based dressings.