Denmark Battles MRSA on Pig Farms

MRSA is present at two out of three Danish pig farms


A new study indicates that two out of three pig farms in Denmark has MRSA.

Denmark’s Food and Agriculture Minister has pledged to develop a more effective plan to combat antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria at the country’s pork producers, since a new study revealed that the bacteria is present at two out of three pig farms in Denmark.

According to The Local, the presence of antibiotic-resistant MRSA bacteria that can be transmitted to humans has doubled over the past four years, and is now estimated to be present at two-thirds of the country’s pig farms. In 2007, the particular MRSA strain in question accounted for only two percent of all MRSA infections in Denmark, but in 2014 it accounted for 35 percent.  

It is estimated that one out of every five packs of pork in Danish supermarkets is tainted with the bacteria.

In light of the findings, Food and Agriculture Minister Dan Jørgensen has pledged to step up efforts to curb the bacteria’s spread dramatically.

“For me, it is clear that the previous efforts we have made here in Denmark have not been enough,” he said.

Jørgensen said he would be working with parliament to develop an action plan to combat the bacteria’s spread through the nation’s food supply.  

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