Mexican Shrimp and Grits

Mexican Shrimp and Grits
Staff Writer
Mexican Shrimp and Grits
Pampano Restaurant
Mexican Shrimp and Grits

This Mexican-inspired twist on a traditional Southern comfort dish is perfect for brunch, lunch, or dinner. Pleasantly chewy hominy stands in for the usual grits, and Mexican chorizo and poblano pepper lends a bit of heat and smokiness to the broth for this dish.

4
Servings
198
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1  Tablespoon  vegetable oil
  • 8  Ounces  Mexican chorizo, diced
  • 1/2  Cup  diced white onion
  • red bell pepper, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • poblano pepper, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • yellow bell pepper, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch dice
  • 1  Teaspoon  all-purpose flour
  • quart clam juice
  • Two  15-ounce cans hominy, such as Goya, drained and rinsed
  • 1  Pound  shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/4  Cup  heavy cream
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • Cilantro leaves, for garnish

Directions

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat and add the chorizo. Cook for 3 minutes. Then, add the onion and peppers and cook for 2 minutes. Then, add the flour and mix well.

Slowly add the clam juice and hominy, bring to a simmer, and let thicken slightly. Add the shrimp and cook until opaque. Remove from the heat and add the heavy cream and lime juice. Serve garnished with cilantro leaves.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
6g
9%
Sugar
3g
3%
Saturated Fat
2g
8%
Cholesterol
17mg
6%
Carbohydrate, by difference
30g
23%
Protein
6g
13%
Vitamin A, RAE
37µg
5%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
4mg
5%
Calcium, Ca
108mg
11%
Choline, total
2mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Folate, total
20µg
5%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
14mg
4%
Niacin
2mg
14%
Phosphorus, P
61mg
9%
Selenium, Se
5µg
9%
Sodium, Na
253mg
17%
Water
124g
5%

Mexican Shopping Tip

How hot is that chile pepper? Fresh peppers get hotter as they age; they will achieve a more reddish hue and sometimes develop streaks in the skin.

Mexican Cooking Tip

There are 60 varieties of chile peppers, many of which are used in Mexican cooking. Handle them with care. When handling the spicier kinds, gloves are recommended. Always wash your hands with soap and warm water before touching your eyes.

Mexican Wine Pairing

Tempranillo or other light Spanish red wine types with paella, even seafood paella. Various other wines depending on what rice is cooked with; see Pasta Recipes and other individual food types.

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