Kitchen Culture: The End of “Yes, Chef”?

From blog.ice.edu, by Institute of Culinary Education
Kitchen Culture: The End of “Yes, Chef”?

 

By Jenny McCoy—Chef Instructor, School of Pastry & Baking Arts

 

Hello, my name is Jenny. I am a former executive pastry chef turned pastry chef instructor. Some might say I’m still in recovery.

 

I began my career in Chicago, working my way up through the kitchens of Gordon’s, Blackbird and Charlie Trotter’s—true icons in the city’s culinary history. My time in these restaurants—like many culinary school graduates—was my first real introduction to the “yes, chef” culture of kitchens.professional kitchen chef brigadeThe “yes, chef” mentality stems from chefs who worked their way up in grueling environments, once called kitchen brigades. These environments were built for efficiency and excellence: a clear hierarchy, where everyone knew their place. The culture of these kitchens tended towards a sort of masochistic martyrdom where the longer you worked, the better chef you were. Chefs at the best restaurants were expected to put work before everything in their personal lives—including sickness and even sanity—to maintain the restaurant’s prestige.

 

Read on to learn why the "yes, chef" culture is disappearing in kitchens.