How to Cook a Christmas Goose

Preparing a goose for Christmas dinner is traditional, and not as difficult as you would expect

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Many families are looking for alternatives to turkey and ham.

You’ve trimmed the tree, bought and wrapped all your Christmas presents, and baked some Christmas sugar cookies. Your house is full of the smell of fresh pine needles, the fire is crackling in the background, and snow is gently falling outside as you sip on a warm cinnamon-spiced latte. Well, don’t we all wish the holidays could be that perfect? But, in reality, we are most likely not that prepared and well-organized for the holidays. And one more thing to worry about is Christmas dinner, but we’ve got you covered for that one.

Click here to see 9 Things You Should Roast This Christmas (Slideshow)

Preparing a goose for Christmas dinner is traditional, but don’t worry — it’s not as difficult or as much of a hassle as you would think. Many families are looking for alternatives to turkey and ham and are turning toward the once beloved Christmas bird. Geese are much fattier than turkeys and when prepared correctly, can be much tastier, too.

After you’ve rinsed and dried the goose, season it inside the cavity and all over outside with salt and pepper. Place quartered onions, apples, oranges, and lemons inside the cavity. Place the goose in a large roasting pan with a rack, breast side up, and pierce the skin all over with a sharp knife, being careful not to cut the flesh. This will allow the fat to drip during the cooking process and result in crisper skin. Roast at 350 degrees for 2 ½ to 3 hours or until the internal temperature reaches 170 degrees. Remove from oven and let rest for 30 minutes until carving.

Christmas dinner is a time for families and friends to come together and enjoy a meal sitting around the table. What you serve is special and takes thought to prepare and serve. So try serving something new and unexpected this year, yet traditional all the same.

Click here to see a Christmas Goose Recipe

For more holiday cheer, visit The Daily Meal’s Ultimate Guide to Christmas!

 

Emily Jacobs is the Recipe editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyRecipes.


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