4 Foods That Pretend to Be Healthy

Contributor
Labels trick you into buying unhealthy ‘health foods’
peanut butter sandwich

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Buying reduced-fat peanut butter will load your PB&J with unnecessary sugar.

We are always looking for the next healthiest thing. Whether it be to lose weight or eat more “natural” foods, we depend on labels and advertisements to give us the in on what we should really be eating.

Click here for the 20 ‘Healthy’ Foods That Are Actually Unhealthy (And How to Fix Them) slideshow.

When you are navigating your way through the different sections of the grocery store, keep in mind that whole, unprocessed foods are your best friend. Anything that is boxed and contains unknown ingredients should be researched before you put it in your shopping cart. We came up with a few common foods that you should eat in moderation or avoid if you are trying to stay healthy.

Energy Bars

When you’re on the go, healthy snacks are a necessity in order to stay full until your next meal. Unfortunately, the low-fat, high protein energy bars you are reaching for are loaded with calories and sugar. Although energy bars often offer fiber, protein, and sometimes nuts and seeds, check your label and make sure it does not have as much sugar as a candy bar.

Frozen Yogurt

Frozen yogurt may sound healthier than ice cream, but it actually has more sugar. Although frozen yogurt may remind you of your healthy, probiotic-rich Greek yogurt, it has about 17 grams of sugar per half-cup serving, whereas ice cream has about 14 grams for the same serving size. Frozen yogurt is fine as a treat but not as a meal replacement or healthier dessert option.

Packaged Turkey

When it comes to nutrition, lean sources of protein include chicken, turkey, fish, tofu, beans, and more. However, packaged turkey is loaded with sodium. Packaged turkey may be a quick lunch or dinner option, but if you have the choice, try the low-sodium varieties, or go for the fresh turkey.

Reduced-Fat Peanut Butter

Peanuts are naturally high in fat, but it is the heart-healthy monounsaturated fat that reduces the bad cholesterol levels in your blood, lowering your risk of heart disease and stroke. Buying reduced-fat peanut butter will not give you a break in calories, but instead an increase in sugar. The fat has to be replaced with something right?

The accompanying slideshow is provided by special contributor Will Budiaman.

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