Fat Tommy’s Chicken Fried Steak Recipe


Nutrition

Cal/Serving: 1,242
Daily Value: 62%
Servings: 4

Peanut-Free, Tree-Nut-Free, Soy-Free, Fish-Free, Shellfish-Free, Alcohol-Free
Fat88g135%
Saturated21g105%
Trans1g0%
Carbs74g25%
Fiber4g15%
Sugars4g0%
Protein40g81%
Cholesterol186mg62%
Sodium4452mg185%
Calcium406mg41%
Magnesium74mg19%
Potassium811mg23%
Iron7mg40%
Zinc6mg42%
Phosphorus740mg106%
Vitamin A1290IU26%
Vitamin C2mg3%
Thiamin (B1)1mg51%
Riboflavin (B2)1mg50%
Niacin (B3)12mg62%
Vitamin B61mg45%
Folic Acid (B9)172µg43%
Vitamin B123µg44%
Vitamin D1µg0%
Vitamin E14mg69%
Vitamin K11µg14%
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated50g0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated11g0%
Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

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chicken fried steak
Maryse Chevriere

A tried and true recipe from a man who knows his chicken fried steak — click here to read Thomas Ryder's tribute to this Southern delicacy.

Click here to see 24 Southern Dishes That You Need to Know How to Make

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INGREDIENTS

For the meat:

  • 1 pound top round steak (ask your butcher to cut into 2 large pieces about 1/3-inch thick)

For the wash:

  • 1 cup buttermilk (not fat free)
  • 1 tablespoon Lawry’s Seasoned Salt
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Cayenne and/or Tabasco, to taste

For the dredge:

  • 2 cups unbleached flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon Lawry’s Seasoned Salt
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ground black pepper
  • ¾ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¾ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¾ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • ¼ cup buttermilk

For cooking:

  • About 1 cup vegetable oil, Crisco, or lard

For Fat Tommy’s classic cream gravy:

  • 1-1 ½ cups half and half
  • ¼ cup pan drippings with residue left in pan
  • ¼ cup sweet cream butter
  • ½ cup unbleached flour
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon Lawry’s Seasoned Salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons fresh ground black pepper
  • Tabasco, to taste

DIRECTIONS

For the meat:

Cover each slice of meat with plastic wrap and pound with a meat mallet or something similar until meat is somewhat less than ¼-inch thick. (It will expand in size substantially.) Leave covered and allow to come to room temperature. When ready to cook, slice into 4 pieces, sized according to appetite.

For the wash:

Add all ingredients to a relatively large, shallow bowl and mix thoroughly.

For the dredge:

Mix all dry ingredients thoroughly in a large, shallow bowl. When blended, pour buttermilk over dry ingredients and mix with fingers. This will form small clumps that will help make the steak crispy.

For cooking:

Preheat oven to about 225 degrees and arrange a wire rack on a cookie sheet. Heat Crisco or lard on the stove in a large cast iron skillet or Dutch oven to about 375 degrees. The oil should be about an inch deep in the pan, so depending on the size of your pan it may take more or less than a cup. Dip a piece of meat in the wash covering both sides then dredge in the flour mixture until thoroughly coated and all wet spots are covered and look dry. Carefully transfer 1-2 pieces of meat to the hot oil, depending on size of each. Do not crowd the meat. Cook until golden brown on each side. This will take less than 5 minutes on the first side and around 3 minutes on the second side. Watch carefully and don’t leave your post. This is where most mistakes happen. When done, use tongs to transfer meat to wire rack and leave in the warm oven until all meat is cooked and gravy is ready.  (If you don’t have a wire rack, use paper towels.) Pour off all but ¼ cup of oil and leave the residue of the steaks and breading in the pan. 

For Fat Tommy’s classic cream gravy:

Warm the half and half in a separate pan or in the microwave. Heat the drippings and butter over moderate heat in the pan in which the steaks were cooked, stirring in flour until thick. Gradually add half and half until gravy is thick but pourable. Add spices and cook over low heat until blended. Taste and correct spices. Now give your honey a high five! Pour over steaks and enjoy. You will probably have enough gravy left to pour over your biscuits and mashed potatoes as well just in case your caloric intake for the day is lagging.

Variations: Sausage Gravy

This is a simple protein-supplement variation that makes spectacular gravy. Sauté ½ chopped medium sized onion until soft in the pan drippings and butter above. When almost done, add ½ pound of Jimmy Dean’s sausage pinched off into small pieces and cook until browned. Then add flour and continue as above.

Recipe Details

 

 

Servings: 4

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10 Comments

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This recipe looks great, however, I add a step to make it even better. I have been cooking CFS once a week for my family for approximately 30 years (yes, I am in Texas).

Dredge the meat in flour and let sit for 30 minutes to an hour. Use egg wash and dredge in flour again. You will not believe how much better your CFS breading will taste!!!

tdm-35-icon.png

Im so impressed to see that this recipe stands true to the southern ways. I see so many recipes out there that leave out the buttermilk and the baking powder in the dredge! As a native Texan, I fondly remember my grandmother and my mother teaching me how to make tender, juicy, mouthwatering, and "slap yer momma" good chicken fried steak. It was (and still is) a must to know how to make good CFS. And yes, we take it very serious. Way to go Tom! PS...sausage gravy and homemade buttermilk biscuits should be a food group!

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As a native Texan now living in Florida, I almost cried while reading the article and recipe. I had "country fried steak" with eggs in a local restaurant yesterday and it was ok. But definitely not what I was hoping for. Guess I'll have to prepare at home.

tdm-35-icon.png

This sounds great I am going to have this very soon! I'm sure I will Love it

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having a coronary reading the receipe

tdm-35-icon.png

as a Scot living in New Zealand, would someone please tell me what "1/2 and 1/2" is?

tdm-35-icon.png

In the US, Half & Half is a common dairy product that equates to 1/2 milk and 1/2 cream. I've noticed that, when abroad (Ireland and continental Europe, to be specific), using whole milk works just the same (in my coffee, truth be told). I think the way milk is process in the US differs from other areas of the world. I would suggest using either whole milk or part whole milk and part cream.

tdm-35-icon.png

Hold on a minute! The name buttermilk doesn't mean buttery milk; au contraire it's what's left over when the butter's been churned out of it. Then by culturing to sour it and thicken the protein,it's turned into its own delicious product that's like no other for bringing out the grain flavors in biscuits, chicken-fry coating, etc. Curious to know what's the highest-fat commercial buttermilk your readers have seen; in my grocery store 1 percent's as fat as it gets.

tdm-35-icon.png

HA! i laugh that you have to specify that the buttermilk used not be the fat free type. If a person doesn't know that, perhaps someone should be making this for them.

tdm-35-icon.png

My mouth was watering! I'm making it for dinner tomorrow night!

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