10 Reasons Why San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bakery Egg Tarts Are Unparalleled

One of Chinatown's most popular bakeries draws lines around the block for its authentic sweets
tarts

Credit: Yelp/ Cat L.

While Golden Gate Bakery has attained a cult-like following thanks to its famous egg tarts, the bakery also offers other treats that you don't want to miss out on.

For those that don't know about Golden Gate Bakery's egg tarts, it's time to learn!

  1. Due to the high demand of these renowned egg tarts, Golden Gate Bakery continually has fresh batches of these yolk-yellow treasures coming straight out of the oven, piping hot.
  2. The buttery crust keeping the eggy custard together is impossibly flaky. Seriously, how do they get the slightly crispy outer crust so delicately, melt-in-your-mouth good?
  3. The fluffy custard itself is far better than any average dim-sum variety you’ve had in the past; the custard is not too eggy or too sweet and has a faint hint of vanilla in it. The egg tart’s custardy texture is light, creamy, and just a bit jiggly thanks to being so recently baked to perfection.
  4. Its real name is: dan tat.
  5. These Chinese pastries are 100 percent authentic.
  6. At $1.75 each — or $21 a dozen — these Chinatown delicacies won’t break the bank.
  7. The ladies who run the counter are generally friendly and quite efficient in making the lines go by quickly.
  8. Golden Gate also offers a large selection of indulgent favorites that include filling lotus and pineapple moon cakes; chewy, mochi-like banana rolls; classic red bean paste-filled sesame balls, sponge cakes, and one of my favorites, No Mai Chi — in English that means snowball with peanut filling — which is essentially a large, warm and sweet peanut-mixture filled mochi ball that’s rolled in coconut flakes.
  9. You can brag to all your San Francisco friends that you finally seized the opportunity to get your hands on one (or a dozen) of the famed Golden Gate egg tarts.
  10. Lastly, going to indulge on these delectable egg tarts gives you a great reason to check out San Francisco’s extremely diverse Chinatown or the always bustling Little Italy that’s just down the street.

The few drawbacks include: cash only and long lines… but it’s definitely worth the wait! Oh, and sometimes it randomly closes, so check here before you go (yes this is really a website dedicated to alerting people when it's open)!

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