Blackened Redfish

Blackened Redfish
Staff Writer
Blackened Redfish

Lilly's

Blackened Redfish

This blackened redfish recipe is simple to prepare, delicious, and takes just minutes to prepare. Save any leftover seasoning for the next time you want to bring a little Louisiana flavor to grilled fish or chicken. If you can't find redfish, try substituting another fairly dense, mild-flavored fish such as black drum or corvina.

Click here to see Mardi Gras: The Feast Before the Fast.

Ingredients

  • 1/4  Cup  cayenne
  • 1/4  Cup  black pepper
  • 1/4  Cup  Italian seasoning
  • 1/4  Cup  ancho chili powder
  • 1/4  Cup  salt
  • 2  Tablespoons  olive oil
  • Two 8-ounce redfish fillets

Directions

In a bowl, mix together the cayenne, black pepper, Italian seasoning, ancho chili powder, and salt.

Heat the olive oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Generously coat the redfish fillets with the rub. Place the fillets skin side down in the skillet and sear until the skin is crispy like a potato chip. Lightly press the fillets with a spatula. Carefully flip each fillet over and turn off heat. Let the residual heat finish cooking the fish. Let the fish rest in the pan for a few minutes. Plate and enjoy!

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
24g
34%
Sugar
7g
8%
Saturated Fat
4g
17%
Cholesterol
1mg
0%
Carbohydrate, by difference
46g
35%
Protein
10g
22%
Vitamin A, RAE
902µg
100%
Vitamin B-6
1mg
77%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
30mg
40%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
98µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
236mg
24%
Choline, total
32mg
8%
Copper, Cu
1mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
23g
92%
Fluoride, F
9µg
0%
Folate, total
40µg
10%
Iron, Fe
9mg
50%
Magnesium, Mg
120mg
38%
Manganese, Mn
4mg
100%
Niacin
6mg
43%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
191mg
27%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
9µg
16%
Sodium, Na
826mg
55%
Water
52g
2%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Fish Shopping Tip

A fresh fish should not smell fishy nor have milky, opaque eyes; it should have bright red gills, firm flesh, and a tight anal cavity.

Fish Cooking Tip

Whole fish should be stored upright in ice in the refrigerator.

Fish Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.