by
TxGriffLover
Beef Stew with Pearl Onions, Bacon and Mushrooms. Once familiar with French food, you become aware how simple it really is and this dish is a prime example of a simple, but sensational dish. The technique for cooking this stew is braising. The cooking liquid will impart a good bit of flavor to the sauce. The traditional liquid for this dish is red wine, but other regions of France may use white wine, tomatoes, cider or even water, along with vegetables more plentifully grown in that region. We love to make this dish for company because the leftovers are even better, reheated. This dish is excellent made 1 day in advance, covered, and refrigerated. Reheat over low heat. Prep time does not include marinating time. Adapted from the Take-Out Menu cookbook, posted for ZWT5.
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by
bluemoon downunder
A recipe from Australian chef Iain Hewitson's book 'Tales and Recipes from a Traveling Cook', which I've adapted and posted for the Zaar World Tour 2005. Huey has published several books and his popular TV cooking show appears twice daily. Of this recipe, Huey says "Try this with different styles of beer - each will impart a different flavour. And, remember, stews and braises are even better when reheated the following day".
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WeightWatchers.com
Collards are typically stewed or braised. Here, they’re cut into strips and quickly sautéed — remaining very crunchy, full of flavor and texture.
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Grace Parisi
Étouffée—from the French word for smother, stew or braise—is a classic Cajun dish of shellfish (or sometimes chicken) served over rice. Grace Parisi uses chicken breast, whole wheat flour and only three ounces of andouille sausage to make the recipe lighter.
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