Top Rated Rice Recipes

Spanish-Inspired Wild Rice, Chicken, and Chorizo Casserole
This dish is really arroz con pollo with wild rice. Wild arroz con pollo? Arroz salvaje con pollo? It doesn't make linguistic sense, but the dish is a complex meal, thanks especially to the wild rice. See all casserole recipes. Click here to see The Ultimate 1-Pot Meal Roundup. Click here to see 101 Ways to Cook Chicken
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Asian Orange Chicken Thighs with Cauliflower Rice
One cup of regular cooked white rice has about 200 calories and 44 grams of carbohydrates, while cauliflower rice has about 30 calories and 6 grams of carbohydrates for the same amount. Recipe courtesy of Better Homes and Gardens Skinny Dinners.
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To end your Thanksgiving dinner, make this Rice Krispies treat. It's a sweet treat using ginger cookies and pecans.  Click here for 15 Asian-Inspired Thanksgiving Recipes
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Mini Naan Butter Chicken and Rice Tacos
Staying true to authentic baking methods, these flatbreads are made with the finest ingredients using traditional baking methods. Stonefire recipes showcase the versatility of our flatbreads. In 15 minutes you can create a delicious, easy meal for you and your family!
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Tenderloin tips are exactly what their name says they are: tender. As the tip of a filet, they're considered scraps and are sold for cheaper. Amped up with a little seasoning, like the soy sauce, sake, and rice wine vinegar in this recipe, and they instantly outrank their filet counterparts. 
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Indonesian Fried Rice
This is one of the most popular items at Spice Market. Fried rice is commonly eaten for breakfast in Indonesia, where it is called "nasi goreng," and in some locales it is still served wrapped in a banana leaf. For a truly authentic experience, look for some kecap manis (sweet, thick soy sauce), a popular condiment for many Indonesian dishes, in the international foods aisle or an Asian specialty grocery store.
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Cantonese Sticky Rice wrapped in Lotus Leaves
This dish is served at dim sum, a traditional way of eating that dates back to the Ch'in Dynasty with royal origins. At least, that's how one version of the story goes. Another, equally compelling tale revolves around the Silk Route; more than 1,000 years ago, roadside tea houses used to serve small plates of food with tea to weary travelers. Whichever tale you believe doesn't change the fact that this is a delicious snack to serve with tea.
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Oyako Don
Never mind the chicken or the egg. How about the chicken and the egg? “Oyako” means “parent and child” in Japanese, and so this dish is open to many interpretations. The most commonly found version here in the U.S., however, is the chicken and the egg over rice. Whoever invented this dish had a pretty decent grasp of the concept of irony — I wonder how the chicken would have felt if it had known that it would end up cooked next to its progeny. Or did the egg come first? (In this case, I’m not sure that’s possible.) Alas, I’m anthropomorphizing, and none of this really matters because unless you live on a farm, those eggs probably didn’t hatch from the same chickens. Either way, it’s a delicious and simple comforting dish. Click here to see What Are Heirloom Eggs?
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Kabsa
When I was young and we had guests coming over, one of the dishes my mum always made was kabsa. Serving platters loaded with spicy golden rice and chicken topped with almonds and raisins would take center stage on the table. My part in it was to chop the tomatoes, slice the peppers, and grate the carrots. You can say I was mum’s sous chef. Kabsa or kabseh is one of the traditional dishes served in the Arabian Gulf area. It is a unique mixture of rice (has to be long grain and you can use basmati), meat (chicken, beef, goat, lamb, or even camel), spices, and vegetables topped with nuts and raisins. The secret to kabsa’s identity and taste is the blend of spices used in it: black pepper, allspice, cloves, cardamom, saffron, cinnamon, black lime, bay leaves, and nutmeg are some of the spices that lend their magic to make kabsa a special and memorable dish. I am sharing my own kabsa recipe which is mildly adjusted from my mum’s, and she makes awesome kabsa. I urge you to give it a try as is and from there you can adjust the spices, change the vegetables, and make the recipe your own.
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Fried Egg with Wild Rice and Kale
This protein- and energy-packed dish was inspired by the delicious and lovely eggs sent to us by Pete and Gerry's. With a half-dozen blue eggs (from Ameraucana hens) and a half-dozen chocolate-red eggs (from Marans hens), us editors got to make a dish that showcased the brilliant taste and color of the eggs.  I wanted a dish that would allow me to really enjoy the rich flavor of the deep orange yolk — and what better than breaking a fried egg over a mountain of spicy kale and wild rice? It makes a quick and easy dinner, especially if you already had leftover rice.  Feel free to substitute other winter greens for kale, and adding sautéed mushrooms or other vegetables can't hurt.  Click here to see What Are Heirloom Eggs?
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Equally as good as the classic
Most everyone has an opinion about meatloaf. Some love its homey comfort made from their mom’s recipe. Some think of it as a heavy-duty boring blast from the past. Some would never eat it. Enter rice and lentil loaf with mass appeal! Whether you’re a meat eater, vegetarian or trying to cut meat from your meals more often (think Meatless Monday), this loaf is a great option for you to try. Whatever your opinion of the classic dish, this recipe is meatloaf-like enough for fans, but different enough for meatloaf foes. The addition of rice, lentils and vegetables makes it a healthy dish, and although it has almost the same texture as meatloaf, it gives you the chance to try something a little out-of-the ordinary. Best of all, the leftovers are amazing, cold and straight from the fridge!  
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Food plays a big role in a Vietnamese funeral. To prepare the deceased for the journey, at the wake the mouth is kept open so visitors can drop in grains of rice. Mourners bring a bowl of rice to place on top of the coffin so that by the end of the wake, there will be so much weight on top that the devil will not be able to get into the coffin. On the 49th and 100th days after the death, the family gathers to remember the deceased with a special meal; bun ho often fits the bill.In the book Death Warmed Over: Funeral Food, Rituals, and Customs From Around the World learn how 75 different cultures from various countries and religions around the world use food in conjunction with death in ritualistic, symbolic, and even nutritious ways.Photo Modified: flickr/ goodiesfirst
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