Top Rated Poolish Recipes

Poolish
Poolish has become our favorite starter in the bakery. We enjoy using it because it gives our bread a moist, open-holed crumb, a chewy texture, and a sweet, pleasant flavor of fermentation without any sourness.  Don’t be discouraged by the process of making a starter. Poolish is very easy to make and adds so much character to breads like French baguettes and rustic Italian bread. It’s made from the tiniest bit of yeast we can measure, combined with equal weights of water and flour. The mixing takes about 3 minutes, and the rest of the work is done by the yeast which slowly ferments with the flour and water. The poolish should be mixed 6-24 hours before you plan to make your bread. When used in your dough, the final result will be sophisticated bread that makes you look like a professional baker.   Click here to see the How to Make Amy's Bread Slideshow. Adapted from "Amy's Bread, Revised and Updated" by Amy Scherber, Toy Kim Dupree, and Aimee Herring.   
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3.583335

Ciabatta
Ciabatta is a flat, rustic Italian bread that is substantially wider and flatter than a regular loaf. Its Italian translation is “slipper,” which is indicative of its baked shape. It is made in almost every region of Italy, with each region having its own style. Depending upon the locale, the texture can range from a firm, slightly tough crust and a soft, chewy interior to a very crisp crust with a light, holey interior. Ciabatta dough can be seasoned with salt, olives, herbs, or extra-virgin olive oil, each of which will change its texture somewhat. If made with whole-wheat flour, it is known as ciabatta integrale; with milk, ciabatta al latte. In the United States, ciabatta is most often made with a sourdough starter and a very wet dough that produces a sour-tasting loaf with a very open crumb. No matter the style, ciabatta makes an excellent sandwich loaf and is often used to make panino, the classic grilled Italian sandwich.
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2.5

by
bsherrill
Ingredients: 3 1/4 cups poolish (22.75 oz.) 3 cups unbleached bread flour (13.5 oz.) 1 3/4 tsp sea salt 1 1/2 tsp instant yeast 3 to 6 oz. milk or buttermilk, lukewarm 90F to 100F Semolina flour or cornmeal for dusting 1. Remove the polish from the ...
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by
Red Apple Guy
A good portion of the flour in this recipe is fermented before the dough is made to better convert the flour to sugars and generally improve the flavor. This pre-ferment is called a poolish and is allowed to bubble and develop a nice aroma and flavor. This recipe is my take on Syd's White Sandwich bread from another site. While the process can take up to 3 days, the active time making the bread is the normal amount of time, long resting periods are added to improve flavor.
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by
trigger
This recipe is from the book” BREAD a Bakers Book of Techniques and Recipes” by Jeffrey Hamelman. A wonderful bread with a rich golden color. Made when taking baking course at the San Fransisco Baking Institute.
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by
dbcurrie
What bread is more classic and more French than the baguette? This recipe from The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Bread Baking is simple, really. Just flour, water, yeast, and salt. But with bread baking, ingredients are sometimes less important than technique. Take the same ingredients, even in the same quantities, and if you handle them in a different way, you'll end up with a completely different bread. This recipe takes 18 hours, so you need to plan in advance. However, the work involved is minimal. You'll get a better shape if you have baguette pans, but you'll be fine baking these loaves on a baking sheet or directly on a baking stone in the oven. Don't let the lack of a specialty pan deter you from making this crisp-crusted classic. This bread is perfect with a bit of butter or cheese or dunked into a soup or broth. As always with our Cook the Book feature, we have five (5) copies of The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Bread Baking to give away this week. Adapted from The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Bread Baking by the French Culinary Institute. Copyright © 2011. Published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang. Available wherever books are sold. All Rights Reserved
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by
violet
For a crusty artisan-style bread, start with a sponge, or 'poolish,' and let the flavors build during a long slow fermentation process.
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Galley Wench
This recipe produces an extremely light, air pocket-riddled loaf, wonderful for dunking in soup or splitting lengthwise, to make a sandwich. The bread begins with an overnight biga (starter), which improves both this simple loaf’s texture, and its taste.. The use of a biga will also increase the loaf’s shelf life. I found this recipe on King Arthur Flour's site while researching baking with poolish and biga (starters). Time includes prefermentation and rise. NOTE: I experimented and baked one loaf (the one on the right in photo) as directed and the other (loaf on the left) I baked it covered in a Romanetopf Clay Pot. Flavor was very similar but definitely preferred the crust of the loaf that was baked in the clay pot.
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Galley Wench
Herbes De Provence is a mixture of savory, thyme, fennel, and lavender, however you can use herbs of your choice; such as rosemary, dill, basil, thyme, mint, chives, etc. If you choose to make with herbs other than Herbe de Provence you may want to reduce the amount. This recipe comes from an internet site called The Fresh Loaf. Prep times includes time required to ferment the poolish. UPDATE: Please note that the dough should be tacky, add additional flour a couple tablespoons at time if the dough is sticky!
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