Top Rated Mushroom Recipes

Seafood Ceviche
Traditionally made with raw fish, cooked by the citrus juice, this version of the Peruvian favorite might just become one of yours. This former seaside appetizer is full of crunch, creaminess, citrus and zest, a great way to start a meal or even snack on! Click here to see more Healthy, International Cooking at Home.
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5

Mushroom Calzone
This is another recipe inspired by the delicious, fresh mushrooms my dad gathers on his "mushroom hunts" at home in Northern California. At the peak of chanterelle season, we often have a surplus of the woody, flavorful mushrooms around the house and they pop up in everything from lasagnas to risotto to pizza. I couldn't find chanterelles at this time of year in New York City, but if you can get a hold of them, I would absolutely recommend adding them into this calzone for an extra level of flavor. Click here to see 'Shrooms: They're What's for Dinner Tonight.
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4.8

Mushroom Tacos
As posted on Grab a Plate To me, this Mushroom Taco recipe is magical. Need to make a meal out of next-to-nothing? Poof! It’s all in the magic of the mushrooms! This recipe couldn’t be easier to put together and you can use just about any type of hearty mushrooms. The original recipe called for chanterelles (which are heavenly!) but I used cremini (cheaper, easier to get your hands on). I used whole-wheat tortillas for the base of my tacos. Lightly grill them or heat them, and fill them up with this mushroom mixture. You’ll be surprised at how filling they are, too. Looking for some nutritional value in this dish? Mushrooms are full of vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium to build and maintain strong bones.
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4.75

Roasted Mushrooms
Fragrant, juicy mushrooms are given an even more intense flavor thanks to the extra garlic and herbs.This recipe is courtesy of Martha Stewart.
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4.5

This mushroom gravy recipe is perfect for Thanksgiving. It is simple to make and different than your ordinary gravy. 
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4

Mushroom Stock
You will not be sorry you took the time to make your own stock. As you cook and are busy prepping vegetables and such, e.g., carrots, celery, onions, mushrooms, parsley, and thyme, rather than toss or compost the carrot tops and peels, celery ends and leaves, onion ends and cores, shiitake and button stems, thyme and parsley stems, and any other produce bits you collect, save them. (Skip vegetables like kale, cabbage, broccoli, or anything with a dominating flavor or color that you wouldn’t want in a mushroom stock — no beets!) — Shroom by Becky Selengut
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4

Mushrooms
This finely chopped mushroom mixture sautéed with butter and herbs is a traditional French preparation used in many sauce and stuffing recipes. It’s said to have been invented by the 17th-century French chef François Pierre La Varenne, who supposedly named it for his employer Nicolas Chalon du Blé, marquis d'Uxelles. You can use most any kinds of common mushrooms depending on the flavor you’re looking for.
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4

Mushroom stems are the first thing to go into the trash when prepping mushrooms, but they actually yield a lot of that deep earthy flavor that people love from mushrooms. This mushroom chip recipe makes use of the entire mushroom, and is a healthy alternative to a serving of potato chips and dip. 
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4

Mushroom couscous
Cooking dinner on the cheap is only easy when you have tons of (admittedly basic) ingredients in your kitchen. Nothing makes me more annoyed than when I have a great recipe idea, run to the store for ingredients, use about half of them for dinner, and then watch as they sit and rot in my fridge. (I have a theory that ordering delivery actually makes perishables go bad quicker…) But this recipe is every lazy chef's constant friend — assuming all lazy chefs really like mushrooms and couscous. The white wine and butter come together so nicely (duh) with the Baby Bella mushrooms and onion, and the couscous acts as such a welcoming vehicle for those subtle flavors. It’s the kind of dish that can be either a light (and cheap) meal in front of the TV or paired with some yummy grilled fish for a heartier dinner. It happens to be super quick and easy to put together, as well. But perhaps the best part of this dinner is how much it cost to put it together — the box of couscous ran me $1.99, the mushrooms cost $1.99, an onion was 65 cents, and the bottle of white wine I had opened the night before was a mere $13. In the end, I used half the box of couscous, half the mushrooms, and ¼ cup of white wine… Grand total? $6.39!  Total cost: $6.39 Click here to see Dinner for Two Under $10. 
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3.75

Alice Waters once told us that her dear friend Martine could feed nine people with one chicken. With the meaty 6- to 8-pound chickens we buy from our local farmer, we can do the same thing.
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3.269665

Incredibly easy to make, this low-sodium mushroom broth is a great base for soups, stocks, and sauces. 
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3

Warm Wild Mushroom Salad
For those cooler spring evenings, try this easy-to-make salad featuring your choice of assorted seasonal wild mushrooms. 
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3