Top Rated Madeleine Recipes

Davide Luciano​
This very special rendition of the traditional madeleine is made with browned butter and the scraped pulp of a vanilla bean. Its flavor is reminiscent of butterscotch (when I first noticed that, I decided to play it up and included a splash of booze in the recipe). Its texture is precisely what you want in a mad: light when it’s warm (the most delicious temperature for a madeleine) and much like your favorite buttery sponge cake a day later (the most wonderful texture for dunking).While you can make madeleines in small molds of any shape, the classic molds are shell-shaped. By baking the batter in these shallow molds, you get cookies that are beautifully brown on the scalloped side and lightly golden on the plain side. Actually, the plain side isn’t so plain — it’s normally mounded. I say normally, because hundreds of madeleines later, I’ve discovered that the “bumps” can be perfidious — you can’t count on them to turn up reliably. It’s annoying but not tragic, since the flavor and texture are consistently as they should be despite the occasional, always puzzling flatness.Under the theory that it’s impossible to have too many choices when it comes to mads, I urge you to make these beauties, the Classics (see Playing Around).Recipe excerpted from Dorie Greenspan’s newest cookbook Dorie’s Cookies. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5

Davide Luciano​
This very special rendition of the traditional madeleine is made with browned butter and the scraped pulp of a vanilla bean. Its flavor is reminiscent of butterscotch (when I first noticed that, I decided to play it up and included a splash of booze in the recipe). Its texture is precisely what you want in a mad: light when it’s warm (the most delicious temperature for a madeleine) and much like your favorite buttery sponge cake a day later (the most wonderful texture for dunking).While you can make madeleines in small molds of any shape, the classic molds are shell-shaped. By baking the batter in these shallow molds, you get cookies that are beautifully brown on the scalloped side and lightly golden on the plain side. Actually, the plain side isn’t so plain — it’s normally mounded. I say normally, because hundreds of madeleines later, I’ve discovered that the “bumps” can be perfidious — you can’t count on them to turn up reliably. It’s annoying but not tragic, since the flavor and texture are consistently as they should be despite the occasional, always puzzling flatness.Under the theory that it’s impossible to have too many choices when it comes to mads, I urge you to make these beauties, the Classics (see Playing Around).Recipe excerpted from Dorie Greenspan’s newest cookbook Dorie’s Cookies. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5

pumpkin
These madeleines are for all those who go crazy for pumpkin spice lattes come fall! This gluten-free recipe will surely fill your house with those same spicy scents. If you don’t have a madeleine pan, feel free to make the batter into muffins or a sheet cake, which tastes best when topped with a chai frosting.This recipe is courtesy of Lena Kwak 
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4

Traditional Madeleines
I love watching madeleines bake, the batter rising with the characteristic little bump, pregnant with flavor. It's important not to overbake madeleines; they must be moist. We found when testing these at home that the best way of preventing them from sticking is to thoroughly butter the mold and then refrigerate or freeze the pan to harden the butter before adding the batter. And if your madeleine mold is very old, consider buying a new nonstick one.
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3.42857

Chocolate Madeleines
These chocolate madeleines are a delicious take on the traditional vanilla or lemon ones. They might not trigger an involuntary memory, but they'll surely make you reach for seconds… or even thirds. See all cookie recipes. Click here to see Christmas Dinner: It's Not Thanksgiving Anymore.
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2.4

by
Susan Champlin Taylor
This cookie launched a thousand memories—and a literary masterpiece—for Marcel Proust. Enjoy madeleines with tea, just as the narrator did in Swann's Way.
0

by
Susanwadle
Ingredients: 1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter (6 ounces) 2 tablespoons softened unsalted butter (for greasing pan) 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 4 large eggs a pinch fine-grain sea salt 2/3 cups sugar zest of one large lemon 1 teaspoon vanilla ...
0

by
Monica_Pereira
Ingredients: 200 g Farinha de Trigo 4 g Fermento em pó 130 g Manteiga 200 g Açúcar 1 Unidade Limão (raspas) 155 g Ovos 150 ml Leite 10 ml Essência de baunilha Misture a farinha de trigo eo fermento em póBata na batedeira, com a raquete, a manteiga, ...
0

by
sanjayndalal@gmail.com (Tarla Dalal)
The traditional tea - time cakes, with the delicious flavour of desiccated coconut.
0

This cookie launched a thousand memories—and a literary masterpiece—for Marcel Proust. The group enjoys madeleines with tea, just as the narrator did in Swann's Way.
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Active time: 20 min Start to finish: 40 min
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Lori Hartman of New York City, writes: "I'm looking for a good madeleine recipe similar to the delicious ones (lemony, buttery, and spongy, but crispy on the edges) I used to buy at Bouley Bakery in Manhattan's TriBeCa neighborhood. Can you get the recipe?" The crisp edge on these delightful citrus-scented cookies sets them apart from any other classic madeleines our food editors have tasted. We're never going back.
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