Top Rated Hummus Recipes

Pearl Barley Risotto with Watercress, Asparagus, and Pecorino
We know that the use of the word risotto here should be in big quotation marks. People get very protective about the rules of their culinary heritage. Yotam’s opinion about what is and what isn’t allowed to go into the making of hummus, for example, is as unwavering as an Italian chef’s rules for the ingredients list in a risotto. Disclaimers aside, making risotto with pearl barley adds bite and texture that work very well with the smooth, green watercress puree.Start with thick-stemmed asparagus for this, if you can: it’ll make it far easier to shave each spear with a vegetable peeler and get the ribbons you’re after. Don’t be put off from making this if asparagus is not in season, thin ribbons of zucchini — shaved raw with a vegetable peeler — work well as an alternative. One medium zucchini will be enough to produce about 6 ½ ounces/180 g of shaved ribbons.Reprinted with permission from NOPI by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
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Celery Root Purée with Spiced Cauliflower and Quail Eggs
Ras al hanout is a North African blend of sweet and hot spices, finely ground. There’s no definitive list of the spices that are combined—hoanout means “shop” in Arabic, and every shop has its own “top-of-the-shop” variety—but it usually includes ginger, cardamom, allspice, nutmeg, cloves, black pepper, and cinnamon. Ready-made varieties are widely available and generally fine, but feel free to add to them for your own top-of-the-shop creation. We find that we often need to add a bit more cinnamon when using ready-made varieties.The celery root puree works well as an alternative to hummus. If you want to make just this to snack on before a meal. With the additional elements, though, it’s a substantial starter or even a little meal in itself, served with some warm crusty bread or white pita.We like to fry the eggs here—the crispy edges of a fried egg work particularly well with the puree—but soft-boiled also works, if you prefer.As with many of the dishes in this book, the main elements here can be made in advance, ready to be pu together just before serving and, in this case, before the eggs are cooked. If you make the puree the day before, just cover it with plastic wrap—actually touching the surface of the puree—to prevent its forming a skin. IT’s better at room temperature rather than fridge cold, so bring it out of the fridge at least half an hour before serving.Reprinted with permission from NOPI by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
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The Zahav Lamb Shoulder
One night in 2006, as the executive chef of Marigold Kitchen, I was preparing a dinner at the James Beard House in New York. By the time we finished up, our crew was hungry and exhausted. We rolled into Momofuku Ssäm Bar around midnight, and several minutes later were presented with an entire slow-cooked pork shoulder, crackling on the outside and soft and juicy on the inside. With the familiarity of a kitchen team that had just worked a 14-hour shift, we devoured the whole thing.The Zahav Lamb Shoulder was born that night on the drive home. It was also possibly responsible for keeping me from falling asleep at the wheel. Next to our hummus, this is the dish that put Zahav on the map. We brine a whole lamb shoulder and smoke it over hardwood for a couple of hours. Then we braise it in pomegranate molasses until the meat is tender enough to eat with a spoon. Finally, the lamb shoulder is finished in a hot oven to crisp up the exterior. This dish is the best of all possible worlds — smoky and crispy, soft and tender, sweet and savory — and it’s a celebration all by itself. The use of pomegranate in this dish (and the crispy rice we serve with it) is very Persian, which is a cuisine with tradition so rich it always makes me think of palaces and royal banquets. The chickpeas recall the humble chamin, a traditional Sabbath stew that’s slow-baked overnight.Chickpeas, the underrated star of this dish, recall the humble chamin, a traditional Sabbath stew that’s slow-baked overnight. During the long braise, the lamb bones create a natural stock that is absorbed by the chickpeas, creating the richest, creamiest peas you’ve ever tasted. I’ve even made hummus with these chickpeas — totally decadent!Preparing the lamb shoulder is a two- or three-day process and thus requires some advance planning. We go through about sixty shoulders a week at the restaurant, and it’s still not enough. If you’ve ever been disappointed at Zahav, chances are it’s because we didn’t have a lamb shoulder for you. Now, you can make it for yourself.We smoke our lamb shoulders at Percy Street Barbecue. If you have a smoker, feel free to smoke the lamb. Or just roast the shoulder as the recipe indicates.From Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking, ©2015 by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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