From the blog: http://chatteringkitchen.com  Tagine: a dish which put Moroccan cuisine on the world culinary map. Quite literally, tagine is the name given to a deep earthenware pot with a large conical cover, similar to a top-hat. The essence of Moroccan cuisine is to let the meat slowly stew inside the tagine, infusing all the flavors while preventing them from escaping. For an authentic North African dinner, you can even serve in the tagine, once the meat is cooked. Defined by the process of slow simmering, Moroccan cuisine is full of spices, albeit not hot. In short, the flavors of the food is brought forth by the use of paprika powder, cayenne pepper, coriander powder and cumin powder. As soon as you lift the lid of the tagine, or your saucepan, the air will instantly be scented with the fragrance of the cooked spices.   No Moroccan meal can be complete without the inclusion of couscous. What steamed rice is to Thai food, couscous is to Moroccan cuisine. Just like its style of cooking, Moroccan cuisine has soaked in influences from Arab, Mediterranean, Moorish and Berber cooking and slowly simmered its way to creating its own identity. Credit for this authentic recipe goes to my sister, I had borrowed it from her years ago for my mother’s birthday dinner once. Today, 5 years on, I decided to give it another go.
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Israeli Couscous
The starch in the couscous thickens the stew as it cooks creating a creamy and comforting main dish. You won’t believe how easy and tantalizingly delcious this one pot meal is. The cumin and cinnamon provide a wealth of flavor, and for the best results use high quality chicken and chicken stock. This recipe can also be adapted to be made in a rice cooker. 
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4.666665

Prepping for bathing suit season and trying to steer clear of too much meat? Fear not, Spring Salads are trending! Try Texas de Brazil’s Couscous Salad for a light option. The Couscous Salad, for example, is made with pasta called Israeli Couscous which comes in the shape of small pearls that are toasted for maximum flavor. This salad goes perfectly with Texas de Brazil lamb chops since both have lemon notes. These salads can be recreated at home by using the below recipes from Culinary Director Evandro Caregnato of Texas de Brazil churrascaria.
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4

Couscous
Looking for a change in your everyday couscous recipe? Look no further than this one from Israel, which features pine nuts and parsley.This recipe is courtesy of Epicurious.
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moroccan spiced couscous salad
Spice up your lunch and dinner with National Pasta Association’s Warm Moroccan Spiced Couscous Salad. With flavorful spices and tasty ingredients, this dish is anything but ordinary.This recipe is provided by the National Pasta Association.
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4

Couscous with Caramelized Onion and Raisin Tfaya
This classic couscous exemplifies the sophisticated and harmonious blending of the sweet with the savory. The broth and tender chicken — laden with a mixture of fragrant spices — are delectable, but the real star is the caramelized onion and raisin tfaya that tops the couscous grains like a regal, honeyed crown. The dish is delicious with cold glasses of lben (buttermilk). See all chicken recipes. Click here to see A Regional Approach to Moroccan Cooking.
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4

This is wonderful on its own as a side dish. The toasted pearls of couscous can also serve as a bed for an appetizer of poached artichokes, or even as an entrée with a hearty dollop of Cilantro-Walnut Pesto.
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4

Braised Spring Vegetables with Israeli Couscous
This recipe makes the most of the season’s best ingredients — snappy artichokes, young carrots, fresh peas, and their tender shoots — and will guide you through each step of the braising process. On a side note, if using fresh artichokes seems too daunting or time-consuming, you can use frozen ones. The recipe will still be absolutely delicious. If do you have a little time on your hands, though, follow the instructions for fresh artichokes — you won’t regret it. See all couscous recipes. Click here to see 10 Great Dishes to Make with Frozen Vegetables  
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3.75

Broccoli Pesto and Cous Cous
With the kind of couscous that's ready in five minutes, an easily steamed vegetable, and some chickpeas that are edible right out of the can, this is truly a meal that can be thrown together in record time. Click here to see more Easy Dinner Recipes. 
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3.46154

Tuscan Chicken
The first time that I tasted this recipe was at a wedding on an olive estate in Tuscany. The day after the wedding, they organized a huge barbecue and served this marinated chicken. It’s delicious... and I couldn’t leave without a copy of the recipe! It works just as well with pork and lamb, too. 
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3.057145

Spicy Kale and Lemon Israeli Couscous
Couscous: the food so nice, they named it twice. Mmmm couscous... it’s such a great ingredient for all sorts of dishes, like this fun little salad I’ve put together. I’ve made several types of couscous salads before, but this one is my favorite. Even with very few ingredients, this dish packs a punch of flavor! It’s a perfect side dish or is great as a quick lunch. I’ve been eating more and more kale. Why wouldn’t I? It’s delicious and ridiculously healthy for you! And with the addition of loads of lemon and chile and creamy goat cheese, I could eat this salad day-in, day-out. The name, couscous, itself means well-rolled, well-formed, and rounded. And that’s just what these little pearly grains look like, well-rounded little balls of pasta! Perfect shape and size to mix with any other ingredient. And without any further ado, here's the recipe!
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2.68421

Pulled Blackened Chicken with Toasted Couscous
Manna, a 24-hour Middle Eastern/Mediterranean restaurant that is just down the street from my apartment in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, makes great traditional dishes like okra hummus and stuffed grape leaves — but my favorite by far is their roasted chicken with turmeric-scented couscous. It's a dish that should be on everyone's weeknight to-do list.  Click here to see 'Sweet' Cooking Advice from Sam Talbot.
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2.285715