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Top Rated Celeriac Recipes

Soup
Although it's never easy to pack up your shorts and tee-shirts and say hello to winter, settling down with a hot bowl of your favorite soup at least eases the pain.  If you're looking for something new, try a soup with celeriac (also known as celery root), which posesses similar acidity and sweetness to celery stalks, in addition to an earthy undertone which puts it in a league of its own. 
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5

Celeriac Soup with Crispy Lemon Zest
Unlike its cousin, the common celery, celeriac (also known as celery root or knob celery) is grown for its roots rather than its stalks and leaves. As ugly as the root may look, it offers a white flesh that, when cooked, becomes incredibly tender. This simple soup highlights the celeriac’s exquisite flavor and silky smooth texture. Garnished with a drizzle of lemon-infused oil and crispy lemon zest, this is a delicately flavored, low-calorie soup that’s hard to resist! Celeriac is also delicious raw. Click here to see the Celeriac and Apple Salad with Watercress Recipe.
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4

Pan-Fried Duck Breast, Orange-Infused Celeriac, and Candied Kumquats
This is my take on duck à l’orange. Although very different from the classic dish, it uses similar flavor combinations. Celeriac is one of my favorite vegetables, especially with a splash of lemon. During the winter, I use a lot of citrus fruit to add sparkle to a dish. The candied kumquats provide a fragrant combination of acidity and sweetness. Magrets are the big, meaty breasts of moulard ducks (which are raised for foie gras). Or, if necessary, substitute 4 smaller breasts from Pekin (Long Island) or Muscovy ducks and adjust the cooking time accordingly. — Greg Marchand, Frenchie Click Here to See More Duck Recipes
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4

Simple Celeriac (Celery Root), Potato, Apple and Parsnip Soup Recipe
A lot of flavor is packed in this super simple recipe for Celeriac (Celery Root), Potato, Apple and Parsnip Soup made with seasonal ingredients. Subtle celery, tart apple, mild starchy potato and earthy parsnip -- the flavor combo is delectable and the soup is low calorie to boot (about 200 calories per cup and one Weight Watchers Point Plus point when made with vegetable stock). For a nice white soup, use a paring knife to peel the celery root.  
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4

Thanksgiving Turkey
When the food magazines come out the month before Thanksgiving, all you see on the covers are the huge, golden brown, perfect-looking turkeys. I have trouble believing that they taste as good as they look. Turkeys have a variety of different muscles that require different cooking methods to be served at their peak. As a chef, I prefer to break down my turkey and serve each part at the height of its flavor rather than carry a whole bird to the table. So I’ve broken it down for you here.The drumsticks are smoked and then roasted for maximum tenderness and flavor. The thighs and wing flats are braised with a white mirepoix until they are so tender and juicy they practically melt in your mouth. Finally, the breasts are injected with a flavorful marinade made with mayonnaise. I love this technique because the mayonnaise doesn’t liquefy and run out of the meat; it stays in there throughout the marinating period and oven time, so you end up with moist, juicy, perfectly seasoned white meat. This is one turkey dinner that is much more than the sum of its parts.HOME: Recipes to Cook with Family and Friends courtesy Little, Brown and Company Copyright © 2015 by Bryan Voltaggio
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4

Fish and Chips with Tartar Sauce
Here we have homemade fish sticks, lightly coated in ground almonds in place of breadcrumbs, and oven-roasted fries that rely on celeriac rather than potato. You could get out the ketchup, but my own weakness is for tartar sauce.This one’s on my desert island list: just think of all those freshly caught fish cooked over an open fire — all you need for perfection is some mayonnaise laced with capers and onions. — Anne Bell, Low Carb Revolution : Comfort Eating for Good Health.
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3.8

Gratin
I love the aniseed flavor of celeriac. If you’re not a huge fan of aniseed, just omit the celeriac and use all potato. You can also grate some Gruyère or Fontina cheese in between the layers.
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3.434785

Cookbook Cover
Maybe it’s because I grew up spending Christmas Eve in Chinatown with my clan of New York City Jews, but celebrating the holiday has always felt like a work in progress. Since I’m not wedded to any one particular tradition, I’ve jumped around, trying different ones on for size. One of them has become braising a large hunk of meat. For our family, it’s the ideal holiday dish. We can braise it in advance, serve it to friends on Christmas Eve, then reheat the leftovers for Christmas dinner, when we are too tired from opening presents and our annual Christmas walk around the park (one of my new favorite traditions) to want to cook anything new. We’ve varied the contents of the braising pot over the years, but keep coming back to leg of lamb because we both love it and since we don’t eat it very often, it seems like a special meal. Plus, braising a bone-in leg of lamb is an excellent way to cook it. The marrow flows into the sauce, thickening and seasoning it, while the meat collapses and becomes spoonably soft. In this recipe, I’ve added anchovy and olives to the pot to give the sauce a tangy depth that works well with all the rich meat. It’s especially nice served over a smooth, sweet root vegetable purée spiked with garlic, which acts like a velvety sauce. On Christmas Day, we toss the leftovers with pasta. It’s a wonderful new two-day tradition, boiled down into one pot.
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3.4

Celeriac and Apple Salad with Watercress
Celeriac (also called celery root or knob celery) might be one of the ugliest-looking vegetables you’ll ever lay your eyes on. A plant species in the family of common celery, celeriac is grown for its bulb rather than its stems, which are stringy and unpalatable. But beneath that scabby skin and those gnarly roots, celeriac hides an exquisitely perfumed white flesh. And although the root’s aroma is very pronounced, its flavor turns out to be quite delicate. Combined with the fragrant, sweet apples, the ambrosial Meyer lemon vinaigrette, and the spunky watercress, this salad wakes up the taste buds, and makes you (almost) forget that it’s midwinter.
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2.708335

by
anon-jeg6gow8yyth@base.google.com (Belgian-Recipes.be)
An easy to make celeriac soup recipe
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by
English_Rose
This classic French salad combines crunchy, aniseed-flavoured celeriac with a rich mayonnaise dressing.
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by
Cooking Light NOVEMBER 2000
Braising (or slow-cooking) the celeriac mellows its flavor, making it an excellent partner for beef.
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