Top Rated Catfish Recipes

Fried Catfish
A healthier and light alternative to this fried fish dish.    Click here to see the Weight Watchers Gets a Face-Lift with PointsPlus story.  Adapted from "Weight Watchers New Complete Cookbook" by Weight Watchers
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5

 A healthier and light alternative to this favorite fried dish.   Adapted from "Weight Watchers New Complete Cookbook" by Weight Watchers
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4.6

California Walnuts
Seasoned strips of flaky tilapia provide a tasty alternative to traditional tacos. Topped with a light, crunchy walnut slaw with sweet mango, these make the perfect meal any day of the week.This recipe is provided by California Walnuts.
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4.5

Delicious blackening spices elevate beautiful rockfish fillets. They’re topped with a garlic and cilantro compound butter to round out a seasoned entrée. Serve with rice and roasted seasonal vegetables.
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4.5

Using and fresh and flavorful ingredients, this recipe proves that catfish can be more sophisticated than just a deep-fried sandwich.Click here to see What Fish Should You Be Eating Now for Flavor, Health, and Environment.
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4.333335

Clay Pot Catfish with Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers
Here it is, the recipe everyone has been waiting for from season three. Catfish is such a humble fish, a bottom-feeder that can taste muddy if not cooked properly. Christine Ha didn't try to gussy it up with a four-star presentation. Instead, she gently brought out the best in it. She dressed it with some potent Asian flavors — garlic, fish sauce, scallions, and cilantro — and, the magic touch, a little dark caramel that she poured over the fish before braising it in its modest clay pot. This classic technique in Vietnamese cooking brings out the best in a meaty slab of catfish. (If your fishmonger doesn’t have these thicker catfish "steaks," ask for fillets instead.) And her presentation, on a fragrant heap of jasmine rice, with a mound of tangy quick-pickled vegetables, hit all the right notes. Click here to see Cook Like a MasterChef at Home.
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4.142855

Creole Sauce Made with Dark Brown Roux
In Louisiana, a dark brown roux is not just a thickener—it can be a benchmark for who you are as a person. It takes mettle to keep the roux on the stove until the very last minute. The flour must be just this side of burnt, yet with nary a hint of scorching. I will take the pan off the stove repeatedly, thinking I’ve done it, only to grimace and put it back on for just a tiny bit longer. I’m a babe in the woods when it comes to authentic Cajun and Creole cooking, but I have an appreciation for the unique toasted taste of dishes made with really dark, slow-cooked roux.This sauce improves after a day or two and freezes well, so keep some on hand to serve as a dollop alongside a fried catfish fillet, to smother a sausage in a bun like a Cajun hot dog, or to simmer with virtually any mix of meats and seafood for a hearty meal with rice.This version does not call for gumbo filé, powdered sassafras, a natural thickener with a unique slippery texture, because I’m not a fan. Stir a bit in at the end if you like. I usually make my own Cajun spice mix, but to simplify things, here I suggest using a good commercial blend.
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4

I've never been one to detox. The idea of a juice cleanse gives me chills, salads are a bore, and I'm downright offended when I see meal replacement shakes masquerading as actual sustenance. If anything, I'd rather just scale down to something simple after an indulgent meal: soup, a hunk of crusty bread, a slab of cheese, and two or three tangerines. This meal epitomizes my moderation-and-not-deprivation mantra. Light and flaky white fish (I used cod, though you could use tilapia, halibut, catfish, or anything else, really) is married with the best of the waning season's flavors: the viscous kiss of maple, the licorice perfume of fennel, the savory, garlic-bitten chard. It's a delicious post-holiday meal that just so happens to be nutritionally sound. No matter how much you indulge in the end of the year's holiday treats, it's important to remember that even after that extra helping of gravy-doused turkey or buttery mashed potatoes, starvation is not the answer. With flavorful and wholesome cooking, you can eat still complete meals without worrying about the dreaded unbuttoning of the pants. Click here to see Simple Ingredients Made Spectacular. 
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4

Salmon
Try this recipe with catfish, tuna, or trout instead. You can also substitute regular mustard for Dijon. 
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4

Chef Edward Lee of MilkWood in Louisville, KY creates his own spin on this classic Southern dish. The catfish is fried and then placed in a vinaigrette of bacon, grapes, and mustard, creating a tangy, savory dish that reinterprets the traditional meal.  Click here to see 24 Southern Dishes That You Need to Know How to Make  
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4

Catfish is making a comeback, and as Feed Me Phoebe demonstrates with this recipe, it doesn't get any better than when it's dusted in cornmeal and served alongside a savory rice made with two of summer's most valuable players, tomatoes and zucchini.  Click here to see 10 Great Zucchini Recipes to Make with Your Bounty.
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4

Ukha
This traditional Russian soup is the Russian answer to bouillabaisse. The soup consists of a clear broth, fish, and root vegetables. Traditionally, with catfish, bream, or ruffe, but you can substitute whatever looks freshest at the grocery store. 
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4