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danaheller
Ingredients: Grits: 2 tbs olive oil 1/2 cup diced onion 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper 2 tbs diced celery 1/2 tbs diced fresh garlic 1/4 tsp salt 1/4 tsp pepper 1/2 tbs Vietnamese chile garlic paste 1/2 tbs Cajun or creole seasoning 1 to 2 tbs hot ...
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JanetB-KY
Posting this for ZWT 2006 (French, Cajun & Creole region). I absolutely love red beans & rice though I make it my own weird way and when I found this recipe, I had to try it. I played with the spices some as it was rather bland the original way. I serve this kind of gumbo style with a scoop of cooked rice put into the bowls before I add the soup.
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asimplegirl
Once again, there seems to be some mistake between cajun and creole cooking, and then another completely separate group of people trying to replicate a gumbo without thinking. Cajun people do not use tomatoes and okra in their gumbo. We also DO NOT use already made soups, or bases in our gumbos. We use very simple ingredients and get a very good result. Please do not season with hot sauce at the table, it's rude. Please do not use more andouille than the recipe calls for, you will regret it later!
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Malriah
A roux is the base of numerous Cajun and creole dishes. In Louisiana, natives have a joke about how long it takes to make the roux for certain dishes. Etouffee is usually a 1 beer roux while a full fledged gumbo is a 2 to 3 beer roux. Obviously meaning how long it takes to DRINK the beer. The cook time will vary depending on how dark you want your gravy. NOTE: The measurements I used are normally what I make for a Sunday pot of gumbo, southern style. That means it makes a lot! You may want to only use half for normal people!
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Expat in Holland
Being so far away from home, I tend to crave recipes I am unable to get here in Holland. This being one of them! Good ole Cajun and Creole Food. After one of these cravings I decided to do some research and came up with several recipes for Red Beans and Rice. I took bits and pieces from the different recipes, subbed ingredients I was unable to find here and created this easy and tasty recipe. Whenever my husband and I crave Cajun, this fits the bill. Depending on your taste, you may want to add more Cajun spices to suite your family's spiciness of preference. I love to serve this dish alongside grilled pork chops or smoked sausage
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Celticevergreen
Gumbo is perhaps the signature dish, a cross cultural dish, of both cuisines, Cajun and Creole. Creole cooking is city cooking: refined, delicate and luxurious, developed and originally prepared by servants while Cajun cooking is French cooking techniques on a host of new ingredients unknown from the Cajuns stays in Nova Scotia and France, exotic forms of meat, game, fish, produce, and grains.
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Celticevergreen
Gumbo is perhaps the signature dish, a cross cultural dish, of both cuisines, Cajun and Creole. Creole cooking is city cooking: refined, delicate and luxurious, developed and originally prepared by servants while Cajun cooking is French cooking techniques on a host of new ingredients unknown from the Cajuns stays in Nova Scotia and France, exotic forms of meat, game, fish, produce, and grains.
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Megabeth
Ingredients: 2 acorn squash Cajun or Creole seasoning (Emeril's Bayou Blast) olive oil 1/2 tube vegetarian sausage or 3 vegetarian sausage patties (Lightlife Gimme Lean ground sausage) 1 small onion, chopped 1 small tomato, diced 1 clove garlic, ...
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Donald Link
Donald Link of Herbsaint in New Orleans got the inspiration for this richly flavored homemade sausage burger from Cajun and Creole cooking and its prodigious use of tomatoes and green peppers. Here, Link substitutes chile peppers for the usual bell peppers to add heat to the burger.
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International Recipes
from C01 1/2 Pound Loaf:3/4 cup water1/3 cup onion, chopped1/3 cup green bell pepper, chopped2 teaspoons garlic, chopped finely1 tablespoon margarine or butter, soft3 cups bread flour2 tablespoons sugar2 teaspoons Cajun or Creole seasoning ...
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Rick Tramonto
This gumbo was created for Craig Claiborne of The New York Times. When he asked chef Folse to come to his home on Long Island to create a special dinner depicting the evolution of Cajun and Creole cuisine, he knew this unusual dish would be the perfect choice.Recipe courtesy of chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto, Restaurant R’evolution
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Trinkets
Cajun and Creole homes have been dining on Sauce Piquant for generations. Some like it with Alligator, some with chicken. The main ingredient can even be seafood. But the process is all the same. You must have the trinity (onion, bell pepper, and celery), and you must make a roux.
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