This $2.3 Million Countryside Estate Used to be a 1930s Water Treatment Plant

From www.justluxe.com, by Marissa Stempien
This $2.3 Million Countryside Estate Used to be a 1930s Water Treatment Plant

Normally talk of manors in the English countryside leave us dreaming of 18th century buildings, white picket fences and rose gardens worthy of having a proper tea party. This Kent mansion, however, is not that kind of house—it’s so much cooler than that. The estate, given the name The Lime Works, is located on eight acres on the outskirts of Faversham, and boasts six bedrooms, six bathrooms, four floors and two terraces. It’s currently on the market (and has been for a couple of years), and is priced at £1,500,000 (approx. $2.3 million).

The Lime Works kent house

Built in the 1930s, the house was originally a water softening plant with two large towers, and it functioned in this capacity until 1942. In 2005 it was purchased and transformed into a multi-level mansion, with special attention paid to retaining the building’s unique aesthetic. The bottom floors feature floor-to-ceiling windows and grand living spaces, while bedrooms and bathrooms can be found spanning the second and third floors. The master suite occupies the entire fourth floor.

The Lime Works kent house

In addition to a spacious floorplan with one-of-a-kind architecture, the property also includes all the lavish comforts of a five-star hotel. Spiral staircases run through the interior of the house offering access to the estate’s two top-floor terraces, one of which includes a heated pool. Inside there is also a gym suite with a plunge pool and sauna, a movie theater, and an underground garage. Finishing touches on the home can also be customized as Savills, the agent representing the homeowners, cite the home as still being under construction. Roughly 90 percent of the property is completed, the remainder is reserved for the buyer to “design and specify the final 10 percent” to their personal specifications.