Travel Photo of the Day: Calamari

Staff Writer
Provided that you know what you’re actually eating, squid can be served in a variety of ways

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

In some countries, squids are grilled whole.

Calamari has been in the news lately. In the midst of several high-profile food scandals, as well as a mounting concern about the mislabeling of our seafood in the States, some of us are a little more trepidatious when buying seafood.

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There’s hardly a question about what one’s ordering in the photo above, however. Calamari, in its various shapes, sizes, and preparations, is a popular dish in across several continents. In China (pictured above), it’s common to see whole squids grilled street-side. Calamari, as it’s known in Italy, is generally prepared in a similar way to what we mostly know in the States: rings and arms are battered and fried in oil. Filipinos (along with several other cultures) also enjoy eating the ink by mixing it with adobo sauce.

In fact, the only parts of a squid that are generally inedible are the cuttlebone, beak, and eyes.

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