Torrisi Italian Specialties

Row 1

Details
250 Mulberry St (at Prince St)
New York, NY 10012
(212) 965-0955
Italian
$ $ $ $
Hours
Mon–Thu: 6:00 PM–10:30 PM Fri–Sun: Noon–10:30 PM

Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone saved turkey from Thanksgiving (is theirs the best turkey sandwich in America?) and made everyone rethink New York's Little Italy (and Italian-American food in general) when they launched their shoebox of a shop on Mulberry Street in 2010. The chefs recognized the untapped potential of Italian-American cuisine, showing that with love for the genre and attention to detail, it has nothing to do with the foil baking pans filled with chicken Francese and the plates of criminally congealed Marsala sauces peddled to tourists in Little Italy. (Sheep's milk gnocchi with chestnut ragù or halibut Francese with potatoes and bergamot, anyone?) Their meteoric rise on the New York City dining scene landed them Best New Chef accolades from Food & Wine last year. The fact that their tasting menu price has gone from $45 to $75 and the issue of their potentially indelicate superimposition of the name of their next restaurant — Carbone — over the iconic West Village Rocco sign that hung outside the previous tenant's door forever might put off some of Torrisi's original champions. And expansions like Parm (their next-door place with its more casual à la carte menu), their Yankee Stadium kiosk, and plans for two to three more restaurants show a healthy dose of ambition — but hey, the food’s still great and when it comes to empire-building, hey, whatsamattawiddat? -- Arthur Bovino

Around the Web

Foursquare Tips

  • Frank Bruni raved about the Pork Fried Rice - "but instead of pork it was prosciutto on top beautiful, thin, fantastic" - in his New York Diet.
  • The turkey and spicy sauce are not to be missed!
  • House Roasted Turkey: The turkey is marinated in honey, garlic, and herbs, and slow roasted until the turkey is tender and succulent with more than a little garlic kick.
  • Torrisi Italian Specialties is one of the NYT restaurant critic Sam Siftons 50 favorite NYC restaurants. To see the full list, get The Scoop iPhone app, an inside guide to New York: NYTimes.com/thesc
  • Chicken parm sandwich is off the hook. The Turkey was also delicious. I'll be back many times
  • Their chicken parm sandwich. 'Nuff said.
  • Try the roasted turkey sandwich ($9), which features "thick cut slabs of turkey breast, juicy and flavorful from a long marinade in garlic, honey and other herbs and spices."
  • Their backgrounds are Italian, but chefs Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone insist on using domestic ingredients. The must-try dish here, per availability, is the island duck with mulberry mustard.
  • The tricolored cookies here are the best I've had. Even better than the ones from my favorite Italian bakery near where I grew up in Brooklyn. - Amy, head of social media at Foodspotting
  • Chicken Parm hero? Perfect. Roast Turkey hero? A sleeper but equally awesome. Plus the dudes behind the counter will give you an approving nod when you order. Uh-huh. Oh yeah. Niiiice.
  • Number one with a bullet best gnocchi I've ever had in my life.
  • This restaurant is for you if you love fresh seasonal produce and savory bourbon cream puffs. It's a favorite of the editor of Feast NY, Alex Vallis.
  • get a turkey sandwich - the turkey is made with love by my good friend Aaron
  • Good mozz, broc rabe, and potatoes.
  • Torrisi is amazing! Make a reservation, you won't regret it! Below is the Swordfish with Charred Eggplant.
  • Chicken Parm sandwich: a thick slab of top-quality chicken rolled in breadcrumbs, pan-fried in butter, draped with handmade mozzarella and fresh basil leaves and ladled with lively tomato sauce.
  • Torrisi Lunch is a Hobson's choice between chicken parm and turkey; we say, go turkey. For dinner, arrive around 6pm, they'll give you a time to return to dine later that evening. [Eater 38 Member]
  • Chicken Parm is the best I have EVER had. Fresh basil will blow your d#%k off !!!
  • Although the menu changes nightly, meals are Italian in pacing, but American in character. You're as likely to see Vietnamese sweetbreads as sweetbreads Milanese, a shrimp po' boy as tripe cacciatore.
  • House turkey on a roll is money!