Red Wine Researcher Fabricated Data

Staff Writer
A University of Connecticut researcher committed more than 100 acts of fabrication and falsification

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Red wine may have plenty of health benefits (as the French often claim), but new evidence shows that a well-cited resveratrol researcher fabricated and falsified data more than 100 times.

Dipak K. Das at the University of Connecticut committed 145 counts of fabrication, sources say. Das studied the use of resveratrol as a way to slow aging and remain healthy over time, and his conclusions involved stating that "the pulp of grapes is as heart-healthy as the skin, even though the antioxidant properties differ."

You can download the complete report here, if you're up for combing through instance-by-instance recounts of data fabrication. Luckily, one researcher says that this downfall doesn't really affect the wine health research done in the past. "Rome wasn't built on Dr. Das," Dr. Nir Barzilai of Albert Einstein College of Medicine said. So we can all go on drinking for health, then?

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