The days of Britain’s most iconic food may be numbered.

Shutterstock

Are Chippys in Danger? Beloved British Fish & Chips May Soon Become Squid & Chips

Climate change is forcing cod and haddock populations further north to colder climates and could impact fish and chips sales
The days of Britain’s most iconic food may be numbered.

Shutterstock

The days of Britain’s most iconic food may be numbered.

Wheat, lobsters, and coffee are already known victims of climate change, but the latest alteration in our diets due to global warming may come as a shock to Britons. Cold-water fish like cod and haddock are moving further north as temperatures rise, meaning that the iconic British meal of fish and chips might be endangered in the future. The traditional plain white fish could soon be replaced by fried squid. Somehow, “squid and chips” doesn’t have quite the same ring to it.

"In the long term we will need to adapt our diets," Dr. John Pinnegar, director for marine climate change at the Center for Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science, said at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting on Monday, according to NBC News. "In 2025 and beyond, we may need to replace cod and other old favorites with warm-water species such as squid, mackerel, sardine, and red mullet."

Warmer water species like squid have already been increasing in abundance, scientists have noted.

Related

There are 10,500 fish and chip shops, or chippys across the UK, as compared with  a mere 1,200 McDonald’s locations.