Exclusive: Watch a Clip of the New Obesity Documentary, Bite Size

Bite Size follows the struggles and successes of four different obese children around the country
Exclusive: Watch a Clip of the Upcoming Obesity Documentary, Bite Size
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In a world where pizza is a vegetable, it can be difficult to make the right choices for our kids’ health. 

With most children practically born into the lap of processed foods and soda, the rates of childhood obesity have steadily grown over the past decade. Alarmingly, the childhood obesity rate in America is at a staggering 30 percent. Almost one in three children in America is tipping the scales. We’ve seen the horrific statistics in documentaries like Food Inc. and Fed Up. But as with most epidemics, there is a cure. The documentary Bite Size, which will premiere on Vimeo on Demand on Tuesday, March 10, argues that the path to beating obesity is a very personal and individual one. Get a sneak peek at the upcoming documentary with this clip from the movie, a Daily Meal exclusive.

Bite Size follows four tweens and young teenagers around the country, each struggling with their weight. But instead of hitting us with the big picture — number-crunching and bleak facts — the film focuses on each of the four kids’ individual journeys to a healthier lifestyle. One obese boy tries to beat his diabetes by joining the local middle school football team. A girl struggles with keeping the weight off after she graduates from a “fat camp.” Another kid combats obesity with the help of his community by joining the YMCA. Each of the struggling children comes from a different background, proving that obesity isn’t just a poor person’s issue.

“We aren’t a ‘Biggest Loser’ kind of documentary, we aren’t looking to shame anyone,” said director Corbin Billings. “It’s a movie for kids and about kids. We get the emotional struggle these kids go through. You have to love yourself to want to lose weight and make that change. My line of thinking was, if you emotionally invest in these kids, suddenly it becomes a motivation factor in your own life. ‘Well, if they can do it, so can I.’”

The exclusive clip takes a grim look at obesity rates in one of the poorest and most obese parts of the country: Clarksdale, Mississippi, where Miss Ross, a PE teacher, is attempting to get extra funding for a school that has only $250 to spend on physical education.

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