GMOs Are Not Harmful to Humans, But They’re Not Very Beneficial Either, Scientific Group Says

A new report from the prestigious National Academy of Sciences has concluded that GMOs aren’t as harmful or helpful as we think
We shouldn’t be worried about Roundup-saturated, genetically modified crops, but we shouldn’t glorify them either.

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We shouldn’t be worried about Roundup-saturated, genetically modified crops, but we shouldn’t glorify them either.

If you’ve been paying attention to the contentious GMO debate, you’d know that both sides vigorously support nearly opposite opinions: Genetically modified crops are either killing us with pesticides and “unnatural” altercations, or they will save the planet from dangerous food shortages. In reality, the truth is much closer to the middle. A new analysis from the internationally recognized National Academy of Sciences has concluded that GMOs are not harmful, but they’re not as miraculously beneficial as some supporters claim.

The report marks the 20th anniversary of the first time farmers began experimenting with GMO crops. The research took place over the course of two years, and answered one conclusive question: There is no evidence that GMOs are hazardous to people. There was no correlation between obesity, diabetes, celiac disease, and consumption of GE foods, according to the report.

GMOs also saved farmers money, but did not actually increase crop yield, as promised, and therefore could not make long-term promises to help solve worldwide hunger.

Critics of the report contended that the members of the research group had ties to the biotech industry, saying that the report was far too lenient on genetically modified crops, and that “this is not the final word on GMOs.”

You can read and search within the report here.

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