Genetically-Modified Mushrooms That Won’t Turn Brown Cleared by USDA

The first anti-browning white button mushrooms have been given the go-ahead by the USDA, FDA approval still pending
Would you be able to trust the next generation of genetically modified produce?

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Would you be able to trust the next generation of genetically modified produce?

Slowly, new genetically modified produce is being approved and introduced to the American market by the USDA and FDA. Like it or not, GMOs are an irreplaceable part of the agricultural and consumer landscape. The latest modified food product is a new white button mushroom, created by Penn State’s agricultural research department, that won’t turn brown with age.

The long-lasting mushroom has just been cleared by the USDA and now awaits approval by the FDA and the EPA before you’ll begin to see it on grocery shelves.

Yinong Yang, the plant pathologist who is responsible for inventing the new mushroom, says his new fungus will age 30 percent slower than a normal white mushroom, according to Engadget.

Pending approval, this mushroom would be the first genetically modified organism creating using the CRISPR technique — a revolutionary tool that does not rely on possibly harmful bacteria or viruses to alter the DNA of its organic target. Researchers confirmed that there are “no immediate plans” to introduce the mushroom the mass market.

Just earlier this month, environmental groups announced plans to sue the FDA for its approval of non-labeled genetically modified salmon. 

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