The New York Times Published an Iced Coffee Recipe in 1895

Think your generation invented iced coffee? Think again
The New York Times Published an Iced Coffee Recipe in 1895

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‘Iced coffee is a particularly pleasant drink for a warm-weather luncheon.’

We were pleasantly surprised when we found out that nearly 70 years ago, The New York Times provided its readers with a definition of the bagel — “small hard Jewish rolls with holes in the center” — but we were shocked when we found out that the Times had published a recipe for iced coffee in 1895, 120 years ago.

Here’s the recipe from the September 1, 1895, issue of The New York Times, first uncovered by Times editor Sam Dolnick:

“Iced coffee is a particularly pleasant drink for a warm-weather luncheon or tea. Make in a French pot or by any percolating method a third of a pint of very strong coffee, and while it is hot mix with it some boiling milk. Chill thoroughly and serve with chipped ice in small cups or tall glasses with a heaping teaspoonful of whipped cream on each, and powdered sugar handed with it.”

Finally, the Times offers this timeless advice:

“The coffee should be strong, as its strength is lessened in the icing.”

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