Top Rated Yam Recipes

One bite of this incredible fall favorite, made with spice cake mix, yam filling, and chocolate chips, is a an amazing sensation of tastes. It's also a great use for leftover cooked sweet potatoes the day after Thanksgiving.
View Recipe
5
African Kale & Yam Soup
This soup has a wonderful exotic feel to it. The broth is especially flavorful, so be sure to have toast on standby so you can soak up every last drop!
View Recipe
5
Chef Harold Dieterle, winner of the first season of Bravo’s Top Chef, offers his take on a classic side dish. Cassia is a spice similar to cinnamon but has a more intense flavor and is best suited to savory or sweet-savory dishes like this one. If you can’t find it, regular cinnamon is a fine substitute. — Will BudiamanClick here to see Chefs' Favorite Winter Recipes.
View Recipe
5
Yam and Peanut Soup
There are many ways of making this hearty soup, inspired by African cuisine (although yams, tomatoes, and both sweet and hot peppers are all native to the New World). I first tasted a version at a creative vegetarian restaurant in Victoria, British Columbia, the much-loved Rebar Modern Food. (I highly recommend the Rebar: Modern Food Cookbook.) Many people will find the combinations of flavors in this soup novel and appealing. This is a good first course for fall and winter.Fast Food, Good Food More Than 150 Quick and Easy Ways to Put Healthy, Delicious Foods on the Table courtesy Little, Brown and Company Copyright © 2015 by Andrew Weil, MD
View Recipe
4
This is a time-saver dressing that combines two Thanksgiving favorites, Louisiana yams and cornbread, for a delicious diabetic-friendly recipe. Save a step and buy premade cornbread at the grocery store.
View Recipe
4
This melt-in-your mouth coffeecake starts with a time-honored family pantry staple, biscuit baking mix. It's my favorite of yam recipes — I love the naturally sweet yams that are given a hint of tart from the cranberries. This makes a great breakfast treat the morning after Thanksgiving, too. 
View Recipe
4
When you can’t decide between pecan or sweet potato pie, have them both. The gingersnap crust in this recipe sets the stage for the perfect blend of pecan filling and sweet potato mixture, and it captures the best of what Louisiana has to offer, and gets you into that Thanksgiving mood.
View Recipe
4
Thai Beef Salad
The summer going into my junior year of high school, I spent six weeks traveling around Thailand. Other Asian countries offered the same sort of immersion program I was on, so I really couldn’t tell you why I chose Thailand in particular. All I remember is that my dad didn’t want me to go, which turned my idea into an obsession. That was eight years ago, and I have been plotting my return ever since. Until I can carve out a chunk of time to rival my first excursion, I’ve been channeling my interest in Thai culture into the constant cooking and eating (well, mainly eating) of the country’s food. I took my first cooking class ever in Chiang Mai, and when I returned home, I continued to practice my Pad Thai, Spring Rolls, Chicken with Cashew Nuts, Green Curry, and Papaya Salad with the little twine-bound cookbook we had been given at the end of the course. The few dishes not included in its pages were some of my favorites: spicy meat salads like Laab and Yam Neua from Isaan, where I spent two weeks living with a family in a small rice-farming village. Luckily, the flavors could live on in my mind through the many sub-par Thai take-out joints on St. Mark’s Place. But recently, thanks to a contest for your Best Beef Salad on Food52, I began experimenting with a bastardized version of my two favorites — Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum) and Spicy Beef Salad (Yam Neua). The two are usually eaten in tandem at the table, alternated between mouthfuls of sticky rice, and are dressed with the classic Thai combination of lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, and just as much chile as you can stand. Both Som Tum and Yam Neua are usually set atop a small bed of undressed shredded lettuce, which acts more like a garnish than a base. I chose to use mizuna, which is normally found in Japanese cooking, to give the beef an extra peppery bite. — Phoebe
View Recipe
4
Spicy Yam Potato Salad
This spiced, lighter version of a classic potato salad will improve every summer picnic or potluck you’re hosting.This recipe is courtesy of The Kitchy Kitchen.
View Recipe
3
Red Yam and Kale Salad
Kale gets an interesting charred flavor from a quick, hot toss in a cast-iron pan. Dressed simply with extra-virgin olive oil and tossed with perfectly cooked yams, it's a hearty side dish or starter for an elegant meal. See all yam recipes. Click here to see Christmas Dinner: It's Not Thanksgiving Anymore.
View Recipe
3
Candied Yams
This recipe is a rich and delicious addition to your holiday meals. If you want to enhance your already incredible yams, there's nothing better than marshmellows.
View Recipe
2.5
Yams
This is based on a family recipe from my mother. The pecan crust lends a nice crunch to the yams, and the spices add a touch of refinement. Click here to see The Perfect Christmas Dinner.
View Recipe
2.29412