This salty, sweet, and woody infusion is a perfect base for mixing a desert cocktail, though I wouldn’t gild the lily with too many other cocktail ingredients. Shake it up with an ounce of Bailey’s or an ounce of pumpkin spice liqueur for a decadent after dinner sweetie. Also, whatever you do, don’t throw away the boozy, caramel fat-cap you skim off the top. Melt it down and pour it over ice cream, stir it into coffee, or smear it on cinnamon toast. It’s almost better than the infusion itself. Read more about The Best Whiskey Infusions You Can Make.
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Bread Pudding Soufflé with Whiskey Sauce
Tory McPhail is the James Beard Award-winning chef at New Orleans' legendary Commander's Palace, and this is his recipe for the restaurant's most famous dessert, bread pudding soufflé with whiskey sauce.
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4.5
The bold flavors in this incredible date cake will add a nice contrast to the traditional treats served on your holiday dessert table. This recipe by JeanMarie Brownson was originally published in the Chicago Tribune
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4.5
Apple Cheddar Scones With Hard Cider and Whiskey Glaze
Apple and cheddar are a natural pairing, but fresh apple can make pastries like this a bit stodgy, and the subtle apple flavor gets lost. Dried apple brings an intensity of the fruit flavor that can stand up to the cheddar and gives nice little nuggets of chew. A glaze made with hard cider and apple butter enhances the apple flavor, with a tiny splash of Irish whiskey for a little extra punch. —Stacy BallisThis recipe is by Stacy Ballis and was originally published in the Chicago Tribune.
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4.5
No Christmas get together would be complete without Irish coffee. The cocktail is a great way to unwind after a filling meal of ham, mashed potatoes and apple pie. Recipe courtesy of Diageo
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4.5
Proper Manhattan
A classic Manhattan that is perfect for any occasion, whether you're at a New Year's Eve party or settling at home for the night. Recipe courtesy of Proper No. Twelve Irish Whiskey
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4.5
I love the combination of smoke and spice with whiskey, and this infusion has both in spades. Use a good rye whiskey as it isn’t as sweet as bourbon, and will allow the smokey, citrus characteristics to shine through. Feel free to remove the seeds from the peppers to dial down the heat. Read more about The Best Whiskey Infusions You Can Make.
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4
You don’t need a cold to add this infusion to a cup of hot tea, but it’ll certainly help if you do. The classic comfort combo of ginger, lemon, and honey will cure what ails you, but will also satisfy stirred over ice with a half-ounce of Cointreau and a dash of Angostura bitters. Read more about The Best Whiskey Infusions You Can Make.
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4
I like to imagine a couple of old, windblown fence-riders carrying this spicy infusion along the border in their saddlebags. Depending on how spicy you care to make it, you can remove the seeds for a mellower heat. It’s perfect on its own, or if you want to mix with it, try adding a half-ounce of homemade sour mix (lemon and lime juice, and simple syrup), and a dash of grapefruit bitters for a fiery whiskey sour. Read more about The Best Whiskey Infusions You Can Make.  
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3.2
This traditional hot drink is the best antidote to being so overwhelmed by the cold you don't even feel like going out. It will undoubtedly kick off your evening right.
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3
Decadent and sweet, but with a hint of tart, this infusion drinks beautifully on its own as an aperitif, or mixed in as the base of a dessert cocktail. Try adding an ounce of Godiva white chocolate liqueur, and an ounce of heavy cream, shaken and poured over ice. Read more about The Best Whiskey Infusions You Can Make.
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2.5
Whiskey Bacon Cookies with Pecans
This is the crispy but chewy cookie that is irresistible — chunks of pecans and chewy pieces of bacon make a salty-sweet cookie that we’re sure you’ll fall in love with.   
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