Top Rated Veal Recipes

Grill
Heart is probably the most accessible of organ meats. It may be daunting in appearance, but it's meaty and firm and cooked, and tastes very good. It is prepared in this manner in various corners of Lazio, Umbria, and Tuscany. Most butchers will special-order veal heart for you.Adapted from “The Country Cooking of Italy” by Colman Andrews (to be published in Fall 2011 by Chronicle Books).
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Capers
Veal piccata is a classic staple of Italian food. Capers, parsley, lemon juice, and white wine form the foundations of the sauce for this recipe. Try this quick and easy version from Lugo Caffe, located in New York City. See all caper recipes.
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This simple but easy-to-create veal Wiener schnitzel recipe is necessary for a fall dinner. Unlike many more complicated Wiener schnitzel recipes, this delicious Oktoberfest staple is easy for even beginner chefs.
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Making Sausage
This recipe is a great project for the do-it-yourself types out there. Chef Anthony Meidenbauer of Holstein's in Las Vegas brings us this simple recipe for homemade bratwurst. All you'll need is a meat grinder or a friend at the butcher shop, and a sausage maker. You can save the extra sausage casings for the next time you feel like making your own links. Click here to see the Oktoberfest: Beer, Brats, and 'Brezels story.
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Mini Cilantro-Seasoned Veal Burger
Barbeque season may be over, but you can enjoy this modern take on a classic hamburger year-round! These zesty mini-patties made from veal, herbs, and onion can work as an appetizer or entrée. A rosé wine like a Bordeaux Clairet adds a gourmet touch to the dining experience.
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Peas
Lay your eyes upon this delectable recipe of veal to follow the first course in an Edwardian- or Victorian-era feast, adapted from Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management, an authoritative guide to domestic matters published in 1861. Your guests will surely express their delight and satisfaction with your hospitality should this emerge from your illustrious kitchen.
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Veal “Braciola”
Executive Chef Vito Gnazzo, of Manhattan fine dining restaurant Il Gattopardo, creates a delicious veal “braciola” that guests return for again and again. His Southern Italian variation is stuffed with baby artichokes and provola, and is scented with wild fennel pollen that the chef harvests by hand from his own rural property back in Salerno. It’s served with creamy celery root purée and sautéed spinach.
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Roasted Veal Pork Chop
Black trumpet mushrooms are also referred to as Horns of Plenty because of their trumpet or horn-shaped appearance. These mushrooms are particularly delicious and have a buttery flavor and chewy, almost meaty texture. I love to eat them simply sautéed with butter and garlic or, as here, paired with artichokes and cream. Adapted from "Fresh from the Market" by Laurent Tourondel and Charlotte March. Click here to see Chefs' Favorite Winter Recipes.
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This brine marinade is used at BLT Steak for the herb-Parmesan crusted veal chop. Simple and easy on hand ingredients make it a no-brainer next time you are preparing your favorite chop.
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Fennel
Offal is a much under-appreciated meat, but with the right sauce and the right technique, it can be delicious. Here, chef Matt Tropeano of La Silhouette pan-fries veal sweetbread and serves it with a tangy, fruity Meyer lemon sauce and oversized ravioli made from fresh pasta dough and stuffed with roasted fennel and garlic.
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Panko-Crusted Veal Cutlet with English Peas
It may seem like a lot of butter, but I was amazed at how the crust on each piece of veal just soaked it all up — about one tablespoon each. So, if you end up with about eight cutlets like I did, you'll need the eight tablespoons of butter. It may seem a bit decadent, but it's a tasty, quick, and easy weeknight main. And a little goes a long way. Two cutlets per person should more than suffice, especially with all the buttah. Click here to see Butter vs. Olive Oil: What's Better?
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Country Cooking of Italy
Fontina — the real thing, which has been made from raw cow’s milk in the alpine reaches of the Valle d’Aosta for eight or nine hundred years — is one of Italy’s great cheeses: aromatic, herbaceous, a little sweet. It also melts extremely well, and is used frequently in cooking, in its home region and beyond. I first encountered this classic preparation one October almost 40 years ago at a little restaurant in the countryside near Saint-Vincent — I’ve long since forgotten its name — where slices of white truffle were added to the filling.
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