Top Rated Tofu Recipes

Halmoni Dumplings
These dumplings are stuffed with zucchini, pork, tofu, cabbage, and spicy kimchi, and are a staple on the menu at Mokbar in New York City. Recipe courtesy of chef Esther Choi. 
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5

After living in the U.S. for several years, I’ve come to realize that Thanksgiving without pumpkin pie is, well, downright un-American. But this silky pie is so good, you’ll probably want to eat it more often than once a year. Make sure to use a deep-dish pie pan so there will be enough room for all the gorgeous pumpkin filling.
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5

Mini Wonton Egg Cups
Loaded with mushrooms and cherry tomatoes, these breakfast wontons are perfect for brunch parties. Your guests will love how the crunchy texture of the wrappers contrasts with the savory, fluffy insides. 
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4.5

Who said stroganoff had to have beef? This recipe proves that some hearty chunks of tofu and vegan cheeses can add flavor to the traditional dish without the animal product. 
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4

“I love the flavor of passion fruit – it’s tart, but with a fresh, flowery backnote that is unlike any other fruit. Here I add a passion fruit puree to a rich mousse made with cacao butter and tofu. I like to serve this delicious mousse with a topping of fresh sliced strawberries or other local berries. "
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4

This easy recipe is perfect for vegans and non vegans alike!
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4

Chicken Waldorf Tarragon Salad
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Refreshing and delicious, this recipe is easy and flavorful. It is perfect for a concert under the sun! Mochi serves as a great sandwich pockets and works especially well with the chicken salad and are a great festival picnic dish.
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4

Indonesian Fried Rice
Achieve peak performance with Indonesian Fried Rice, made with tofu, peanuts, and nutrient-packed California Dried Plums. Click Here to See More Fried Rice Recipes
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4

Spicy Thai Peanut Vegetable Curry Noodles
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Any easy coconut milk-based curry dish that’s ready to eat in less than 30 minutes. This vegan meal is made filling with ingredients like cubed tofu and sweet potatoes. Recipe courtesy of Nasoya.
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4

Thai Noodle Salad
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This simple shiratake noodle salad can be served cool, at room temperature, or even warm depending on your mood. Add any vegetables you have on hand like baby bok choy or broccoli. Recipe courtesy of Nasoya.
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4

The Poor Man's Crabcake
OK, the name of this recipe is a little offensive to shrimp, but the real reason we call this a "cheaper" crabcake is because of the tofu. When puréed, it becomes a less-expensive filler for the cake batter of any type you want to make, and hey, shrimp is definitely cheaper when crabs are out of season. Don’t be turned off if you don’t like tofu — you can’t even tell it’s there, trust me — and for tofu lovers, it adds the perfect, velvety texture that only a tofu-eater would recognize.  Click here to see Tofu Can Be Delicious — 6 Great Recipes.
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4

Originally eaten by Buddhists in Chinese culture, this dish is served in most Chinese households during the first few days of the new year. There are regional differences depending upon which part of China your family originates from, but most of the dried ingredients remain consistent since they symbolize good luck. A number of the ingredients like the black fungus (fat choy), lily buds (jinzhen), and gingko nuts (bai guo) all symbolize wealth and good fortune. Eating vegetarian the first day of new year also symbolizes purification of the body and upholds the tradition of having no animal slaughter on the first day of the new year.Authentically, this dish contains 18 ingredients. The number symbolizes wealth and prosperity. The stew requires quite a bit of time for reconstituting, boiling, and braising. Most of the prep time is spent rinsing and soaking dried ingredients and then slowly braising the ingredients until the flavor melds.Click here to see The Ultimate Chinese New Year Dinner.
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2.4