Top Rated Tofu Recipes

Halmoni Dumplings
These dumplings are stuffed with zucchini, pork, tofu, cabbage, and spicy kimchi, and are a staple on the menu at Mokbar in New York City. Recipe courtesy of chef Esther Choi. 
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Marinated Tofu Skewers
This is a raw, vegetarian version of a "satay" that comes together with a quickly-made peanut sauce. The tofu gets enough flavor from the green tea marinade so you don't need to cook it. Substitute the vegetables for whatever floats your boat. Click here to see more No-Cook Dishes for Hot Summer Nights.
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tofu ramen
All you need is 5 minutes, a packet of ramen, and a few other healthy ingredients to take your package of instant ramen and totally transform it into a healthy meal. 
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Grilled Tofu Sandwich with Peanut Dressing
There's a trendy, Cambodian-inspired sandwich shop in Manhattan called Num Pang that makes a pretty mean tofu sandwich. Such was the inspiration behind my very own version. Mine traces its roots back to Indonesian cuisine, though, with a peanut dressing that's common on dishes like Gado Gado. Also, just as an aside: While writing this recipe I suddenly realized this would have been really good with some cucumbers and cooked bean sprouts instead of lettuce. Just a thought. Click here to see Tofu Can Be Delicious — 6 Great Recipes.
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Banana Cocoa Soy Smoothie Recipe
With tofu, soy, and bananas, this smoothie recipe is a delicious, easy source of protein.This recipe is courtesy of Eating Well.
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The All-In Salad
The fun thing about this salad is that everyone can create their own version of the dish. If you’re serving this salad at a party or potluck, have each of your friends bring one of the necessary items then, when everyone arrives, have fun building your salads.Recipe courtesy of Lisa Gorman, Director of St. Joseph Health Wellness CenterClick here for more of our best salad recipes.
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The Poor Man's Crabcake
OK, the name of this recipe is a little offensive to shrimp, but the real reason we call this a "cheaper" crabcake is because of the tofu. When puréed, it becomes a less-expensive filler for the cake batter of any type you want to make, and hey, shrimp is definitely cheaper when crabs are out of season. Don’t be turned off if you don’t like tofu — you can’t even tell it’s there, trust me — and for tofu lovers, it adds the perfect, velvety texture that only a tofu-eater would recognize.  Click here to see Tofu Can Be Delicious — 6 Great Recipes.
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Vegan Lasagna
Sometimes the perfect cure for winter gloom is a steaming plate of melty lasagna. Unfortunately, for those who choose a dairy-free diet, its main ingredient is cheese. There's a way around that, though. Cheese substitutes are readily available and are just as good as the real thing. Make this recipe and you'll please vegans, vegetarians, and even meat-eaters. Take it from my roommates, who said, “I don't miss the meat!” The empty dish says it all.  Click here to see The Slow Cooker Challenge.
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This healthy soup is a mainstay of Korean cuisine, perfect for when you’re feeling under the weather. No matter how stuffed up you are, you can still taste kimchi, especially when backed by the power of thick, spicy gochujang, Korea's go-to condiment.Click here to see Recipe SWAT Team: One-Pot Meals. 
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Miso Soup
When it comes to creating a rich and balanced soup, the trick to keep in mind is always make sure you're developing layers of flavor. This starts with the broth and should be carried through to the garnishes. This  miso soup begins with a simple kombu-based dashi (Japanese broth), then various flavors are added (soy sauce, ginger, Sriracha sauce, rice wine vinegar, and sake), followed by white miso, the main ingredients (tofu, shiitake mushrooms, kale, and sautéed scallions), and finally topped with a sprinkle of diced fresh scallions. Click here to see more Warm Winter Soup recipes. 
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Originally eaten by Buddhists in Chinese culture, this dish is served in most Chinese households during the first few days of the new year. There are regional differences depending upon which part of China your family originates from, but most of the dried ingredients remain consistent since they symbolize good luck. A number of the ingredients like the black fungus (fat choy), lily buds (jinzhen), and gingko nuts (bai guo) all symbolize wealth and good fortune. Eating vegetarian the first day of new year also symbolizes purification of the body and upholds the tradition of having no animal slaughter on the first day of the new year.Authentically, this dish contains 18 ingredients. The number symbolizes wealth and prosperity. The stew requires quite a bit of time for reconstituting, boiling, and braising. Most of the prep time is spent rinsing and soaking dried ingredients and then slowly braising the ingredients until the flavor melds.Click here to see The Ultimate Chinese New Year Dinner.
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lime cheesecake
This recipe hails from Fernanda Capobianca, founder of Vegan Divas, and proves that a cheesecake recipe can not only be vegan but can be healthy and delicious for you, too. 
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